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Stitch Tutorials

How to Crochet: Solomon’s Knot | Crochet Video Tutorial for Beginners | Stitch Explorer Series

Welcome stitch explorers! This weeks stitch is called Solomon’s knot. It had me all kinds of tied up in knots, I’m not kidding. I don’t think I’ve ever been so perplexed by a stitch before lol. I plundered through it with determination and now I’m hooked. It’s such an awesome stitch!

This stitch creates the most beautiful open lace pattern that kind of looks like stars to me. Of course, I’ve modified it a bit from the Crochet Bible version, mostly because that version made me want use jump off the Mississippi bridge. Ahah!

The complete video tutorial is at the bottom of the post for all you visual learners out there πŸ™‚

What I changed..

The abbreviation for Solomon’s knot used in the book is “sk.” This was somewhat confusing to me because I normally think of “sk” as “skip” – so for this version of the written pattern, I’m going to use the abbreviation SOL, as Solomon’s knot.

I updated with a foundation single crochet row because it creates a stretchier base, which is great for this stitch because it is a loose and flowy crochet stitch.

Although – If you want to omit this and work just a chain, I recommend using a larger hook – perhaps 3 sizes up from the hook you decided to use for your project. For instance, I am using 4.5 mm hook for my project, then I would want to make my foundation chain at lease a 6.5 or 8 mm to work the chain.

I’ve written out two patterns – one using the foundation single crochet as your foundation row – and one using a chain as the foundation.

The first written pattern is the foundation single crochet and the second will be using a chain to start.

If you want to know how many chains to start and how big your project will be, check out my multiples stitch calculator. This calculator asks you how big you want your project to be, then you enter the multiples and a few other facts, it spits out how big (approximately) your project will be.

Let’s get started!


+ Abbreviations


scsingle crochet
SOLSolomon’s knot
fscfoundation single crochet
dtrdouble treble crochet
chchain
sk stskip stitch
yoyarn over
st(s)stitch(es)

+ Stitch Guide:


(stitches highlighted in pink are clickable with tutorials)

sc – single crochet –

insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo draw through both loops on hook.

dtr – double treble crochet

yo 3 times, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, *yo, draw through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * until you have one loop left on the hook.

fsc – foundation single crochet

to start – ch 2, insert hook in 1st ch. yo, pull up a loop. ch 1, yo, pull through both loops on hook. (1 fsc created)

to create 2nd stitch – *insert hook in bottom 2 loops of the ch 1, yo, pull up a loop. ch 1, yo, pull through both loops on hook* – repeat from * to *

SOL – Solomon’s knot (special stitch)

pull up a long loop (about 1/2 in or 1.27 cm), yo, pull up loop, insert hook around left most leg of chain, yo, pull up a loop (2 loops on hook), yo, pull through 2 loops (that last yo, and pull through 2 is considered a single crochet) (one Solomon’s knot created).


+ Pattern:


Pattern using a foundation single crochet row (recommended)

Foundation Row:

fsc any multiple of 4 + 1 fsc. I used 13 fsc to start my practice swatch.

Row 1:

ch 1, turn.  sc in 1st fsc. *SOL 2, sk 3 fsc, sc in next fsc* – repeat from * to * to end of row.

Row 2:

ch 5, turn. SOL 1 (this one is created at the top of the ch 5), skip (1 sc, 1 SOL), then sc 1 in next sc (which is at the peak – between the SOL’s). *SOL 2, skip (1 SOL, 1 sc, 1 SOL), sc 1 in next sc* – repeat from * to * to end of row (you should have 1 SOL, and 1 sc left). SOL 1, dtr 1 in last sc.

Row 3:

ch 1, turn. sc 1 in next sc. *SOL 2, skip (1 SOL, 1 sc, 1 SOL), sc 1 in next sc,* repeat from * to * (work last sc of repeat into the 5th ch of ch 5.

Rows 4 – X:

repeat rows 2 & 3 until you reach your desired height.

Using a Chain to Start

chain any multiple of 4 + 2 chains to start.

Row 1:

sc in 2nd ch from hook. *SOL 2, sk 3 ch’s, sc in next ch* – repeat from * to * to end of row.

Row 2:

ch 5, SOL 1 (this one is created at the top of the ch 5), skip (1 sc, 1 SOL), then sc 1 in next sc (which is at the peak – between the sol’s). *SOL 2, skip (1 SOL, 1 sc, 1 SOL), sc 1 in next sc* – repeat from * to * to end of row (you should have 1 SOL, and 1 sc left). SOL 1, dtr 1 in last sc.

Row 3:

ch 1, turn. sc 1 in next sc. *SOL 2, skip (1 SOL, 1 sc, 1 SOL), sc 1 in next sc,* repeat from * to * to end of row. (work last sc of repeat into the 5th ch of ch 5).

Rows 4 – X:

repeat rows 2 & 3 until you reach your desired height.

Are you pulling your hair out yet? I hope knot! (see what I did there?) :D.

After you work a few rows of this stitch, I just know you will fall in love with it. Make sure you don’t skip a stitch though – otherwise you will end up with a big hole. :(. I was working this stitch for a few hours, then I held it up to my boyfriend and said “Isn’t this a beautiful stitch!” – he said “Yes, it’s beautiful, but is that big hole supposed to me there?”

I gasped.

Yikes. All that work. I had to rip it back. Don’t be like me. Lay it down on a surface where you will be able to see the pattern through it. I was using white and working on my white countertop – OOPS! lol.

Video tutorial here:

What can I make with the Solomon’s knot?

This is a lacy stitch for sure. I am creating a beach cover-all, but this will work great for open-work scarves, a mesh open-work tank cover, and it would probably make a great market bag!

I hope you enjoy this tutorial, and if you have any questions or comments, please leave them below, I would love to talk crochet!

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