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Stitch Tutorials Video Tutorials

How to Crochet: Cornflower Stitch | Crochet Video Tutorial for Beginners | Stitch Explorer Series

Welcome stitch explorers! This weeks stitch is called the Cornflower Stitch. I grabbed this one from the crochet stitch bible again, but this time only made a few changes (like adding the foundation single crochet row).

Cornflower Stitch

This stitch is perfect for any project from pillows, to sweaters.  It creates a beautiful scallop with tiny holes to accent any home project.

I am making a few changes from the original by adding a foundation chain row.  As you may have noticed, I prefer to use a foundation single crochet (also known as a chain-less foundation row) for a few reasons.

The first being it creates a nice clean edge to the bottom which makes sewing or adding an border much easier.

The second is because it adds flexibility to the project.  That flex allows for easier stretch and less bunching.

Are you ready to learn this new stitch?  Let’s get started!

Cornflower Stitch (Tasha’s Version)

The cornflower stitch is comprised of simple stitches, including the single crochet, double crochet, and chains.


+ Abbreviations


scsingle crochet
dcdouble crochet
fscfoundation single crochet
ch (s)chain (s)
skskip
yoyarn over
st(s)stitch(es)
[…]skip stitches listed in brackets
* … *repeat from * to * as many times indicated

+ Stitch Guide:


sc – single crochet –

insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo draw through both loops on hook.

dc – double crochet

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, *yo, draw through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * until you have one loop left on the hook.

fsc – foundation single crochet

create a slip knot.  ch 2, insert hook in 1st chain.  yo, draw up a loop.  ch 1, yo, draw through both loops on hook.  (2nd st) insert hook in bottom two loops of ch 1.  yo, draw up a loop, ch 1, yo, draw through both loops (2 fsc created).


+ Pattern Notes – Please Read


I like to count my foundation row as a row. Because it includes a complete roll of single crochet and chain stitches mixed together.


+ Pattern:


Row 1: 

fsc multiples of 10 + 1 (in my sample I created 31 fsc to start)

Row 2:

ch 1, turn.  sk 4, *(dc 1, ch 1, dc 1) in next st, ch 1, dc 1 in next st, ch 1, (dc 1, ch 1, dc 1) in next st.  sk 3, sc 1 in next, sk 3* – repeat from * … * to end.  sc 1 in last fsc. 

Row 3:

ch 4, turn.  dc 1 in sc.  *ch 1, sk [dc, ch, dc], sc 1 in next 3 sts (work in ch sp’s), ch 1**, sk [dc, ch, dc] then, (dc 1, ch 3, dc 1) in next sc* – repeat from * … * to end, ending repeat at **, then (dc 1, ch 1, dc 1) in ch 1.

Row 4: 

ch 4, turn.  (dc 1, ch 1, dc 1) in ch 1 sp.  *sk [dc, ch, sc], sc in next sc**, sk [sc, ch1, dc], then (dc 1, ch 1) 4 times in ch 3 sp, dc 1 in same ch 3 sp* (for a total of 5 dc’s & 4 ch’s) – repeat from * … * to end of row, ending repeat at **  then, (dc 1, ch 1) 2 times in 4th ch of ch 4, then 1 more dc in same space (3 dc, 2 ch’s)

Row 5: 

ch 1, turn.  sk 1st dc.  sc 1 in ch 1 sp, ch 1.  *sk [dc, ch, dc], then (dc 1, ch 3, dc 1) in next sc, ch 1**.  sk [dc, ch, dc] sc 1 in next 3 sts (work in ch sp’s), ch 1* – repeat from * … * to end, ending repeat at **.  sk [dc, ch1, dc], then sc 1 in each of next 2 ch’s from ch 4.

Row 6: 

ch 1, turn.  *sk [2 sc, ch, dc], then (dc 1, ch 1) 4 times in ch 3 sp, dc 1 more in ch 3 sp**.  sk [dc, ch, sc], sc 1 in next sc* – repeat from *…* ending repeat at **, then sc 1 in last sc.

Repeat rows 3 – 6.

Congratulations! You’re finished!

Cornflower Stitch Complete Video Tutorial:

What can I make with the Cornflower Stitch?

This stitch creates a great thick fabric with some openness to it. I think this would look great as a purse, pillows, or even a crochet tank!


I hope you enjoy this tutorial, and if you have any questions or comments, please leave them below, I would love to talk crochet!

Stitch Tutorials Video Tutorials

How to Crochet: Carina Stitch | Crochet Video Tutorial for Beginners | Stitch Explorer Series

Welcome stitch explorers! This weeks stitch is called the Carina Stitch. It’s a modified Bar & Lattice Stitch, that I’m calling the Carina Stitch to give it a new twist. In keeping with my stars and sky theme – the Carina Stitch is named after a constellation in the southern sky, that kind of reminds me of this pattern :).

Constellation Carina

This stitch was fun to learn, however, I found the edging on the original version a bit strange, and there was a large section of holes on one side that didn’t seem to match the rest of the pattern. See below:

So I came up with a way to eliminate those gaps and include a foundation single crochet row, with a sturdier and cleaner edge.

The Carina stitch is a beautiful stitch to use when you want to create an open work design that has a little bit of substance to it as well.

I worked this stitch up with a thicker worsted weight yarn and it seems to look better with a thinner worsted weight yarn. I’m using lion brand is 24/7 Cotton, and worked up the first swatch in Heartland yarn. Although both are listed as worsted weight yarn, you will see the difference in the stitch detail is lost somewhat with a bulkier worsted weight yarn.

However, if you would like to use a chain this pattern works in multiples of 4 + 1, then add 5 more chains for the foundation chain.

If you’re working this pattern using the foundation single crochet, you will be crocheting a multiples of 4 + 2.

Okay! Let’s get started. The first pattern is my version, the Carina stitch. Scroll down for the original version that starts with a chain.

Full video tutorial is at bottom of post.


+ Abbreviations


scsingle crochet
dcdouble crochet
ch (s)chain (s)
skskip
yoyarn over
st(s)stitch(es)
* … *repeat from * to * as many times indicated

+ Stitch Guide:


sc – single crochet –

insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo draw through both loops on hook.

dc – double crochet

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, *yo, draw through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * until you have one loop left on the hook.

Carina Stitch


+ Pattern Notes – Please Read


I like to count my foundation row as a row. Because it includes a complete roll of single crochet and chain stitches mixed together.


+ Pattern:


Row 1: fsc multiples of 4 + 2.

Row 2: ch 2, turn. dc in 1st fsc. *ch 3, sk 3, dc 1 in next,* repeat from * to * to end. dc 1, in last fsc.

Row 3: ch 2, turn. dc 1 in first dc. ch 2, sk (1 dc, 1 ch), *sc 1 in next ch, ch 2, sk 1 ch, dc 1 in next dc**, ch 2, sk 1 ch*, repeat from * to * end repeat at **. dc 1 in ch 2.

Row 4: ch 2, dc 1 in first dc, *ch 3, sk (dc, ch, sc, ch), dc 1 in next dc* – repeat from * to * to end. dc 1 in ch 2.

Rows 5 – X: repeat rows 3 & 4.

Bar & Lattice Stitch – Original Version

If you want to know how many chains to start and how big your project will be, check out my multiples stitch calculator. This calculator asks you how big you want your project to be, then you enter the multiples and a few other facts, it spits out how big (approximately) your project will be.


+ Pattern:


chain any multiple of 4 + 1 (add 5 for foundation chain)

Row 1: dc 1 in 10th ch from hook, *ch 3, sk 3, dc 1 in next ch* – repeat from * to * to end.

Row 2: ch 5, turn. sk (dc and ch 1), sc 1 in next ch, ch 2, sk 1, *dc 1 in next dc, ch 2, sk 1 ch, sc 1 in next ch, ch 2, sk 1 ch* – repeat from * to * to end. end with 1 dc in next ch.

Row 3: ch 6, turn. sk (dc 2 ch’s, 1 sc, 2 ch’s), *dc 1 in next dc, ch 3, sk (2 ch’s, sc, 2 ch’s)* , repeat from * to *, ending with 1 dc in next ch.

repeat rows 2 & 3 until you reach your desired height

Video tutorial here:

What can I make with the Carina Stitch?

This is another spring openwork stitch that would look beautiful in a shawl, a beach cover all, market bag, poncho’s and more!


I hope you enjoy this tutorial, and if you have any questions or comments, please leave them below, I would love to talk crochet!

Stitch Tutorials Video Tutorials

How to Crochet: Ladder Stitch | Crochet Video Tutorial for Beginners | Stitch Explorer Series

Welcome stitch explorers! This weeks stitch is called the Ladder Stitch. I really like this stitch and I must say it is much easier than last weeks Solomon’s Knot! I didn’t want to pull my hair out at all lol.

I didn’t modify this one, because it feels like the lace-y openwork would be great for summer T’s or beachwear and maybe the chain edging will look nice with some fringe. Although, I think I can work a modification into the stitch so it creates a more solid edge for sure.

This stitch feels like a great one to modify to create new and interesting designs. I hope you enjoy it!

The complete video tutorial is at the bottom of the post for all you visual learners out there 🙂

If you want to know how many chains to start and how big your project will be, check out my multiples stitch calculator. This calculator asks you how big you want your project to be, then you enter the multiples and a few other facts, it spits out how big (approximately) your project will be.

ladder stitch tutorial
Ladder Stitch Crochet Tutorial, sample above is approximately 6″ wide, and I started with 25 chains [18 + 1 (+6)]

Let’s get started!


+ Abbreviations


scsingle crochet
exscextended single crochet
ch (s)chain (s)
skskip
yoyarn over
st(s)stitch(es)
* … *repeat from * to * as many times indicated

+ Stitch Guide:


(stitches highlighted in pink are clickable with tutorials)

sc – single crochet –

insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo draw through both loops on hook.

exsc – extended single crochet

insert hook in indicated st, yo, pull through 1st loop on hook, yo, draw through both loops on hook.


+ Pattern:


Foundation Chain:

chain any multiple of 6 + 1 ch (add six chains for foundation).

For instance, chain 18 + 1, + 6 = 25 chains to start. If you want to use this for a project and take out the guess work on how many chains to start – use this multiples calculator to help you design your project.

Row 1:

begin in 13th ch from hook, *(sc 1, ch 3, sc 1), ch 5, sk 5 ch’s* – repeat from * to *, end with 1 exsc in last ch.

Row 2:

ch 7, turn. sk (exsc, ch 5, 1 sc). *(sc 1, ch 3, sc 1) in ch 1 sp, ch 5**, sk ch 5* – repeat from * to * to end of row, end repeat at **. sk 5 ch’s, exsc 1 in 6th ch.

Rows 3 – X:

Repeat row 2 until you reach desired height.

Video tutorial here:

What can I make with the Ladder Stitch?

Hmmm….I think you can create beautiful lace scarves, mesh-T’s, or market bags. I think this stitch would be great to make an over tank sweater, or a beach cover-all too! Color changes would look great with this stitch, and even reducing the chain 5 to a chain 3 and skipping 3 instead would make for an interesting modification.

I hope you enjoy this tutorial, and if you have any questions or comments, please leave them below, I would love to talk crochet!

Crochet Spring

Easter Themed Unicorn Crochet Patterns | Gifts | Toys | From Makers Around the World

Easter is coming soon, get ready for the blooming flowers, bright green grass, and bunnies!  I actually saw a bunny in my front yard the other day :D.  It was so sweet!  All this Spring fever and Easter patterns inspired me to gather together all the lovely crochet unicorn Easter themed patterns and toys I could find.  I just love Unicorns, as you may already know…

A friend of mine asked me to make her a hatching unicorn, but I am so booked right now, I found a cute finished hatching unicorn on Etsy to send to her.  While I was searching around I thought, oh my, I need to make a unicorn crochet pattern collection, stat!

Keep an eye out, not all of these unicorn crochet are patterns.  There are some finished toys in here too for those who don’t or can’t crochet. I am a full believer in supporting small businesses thrive, I hope you are too :). I hope you find some fun projects to make, or a special personalized gift for a loved one for this Easter holiday.

Easter Bunny Amigurumi Crochet Pattern

by MyCroWonders

Unicorn Treat Bag Crochet Pattern

by Miss Mary MAC Designs

Crochet Unicorn Headband Pattern

by Lovely Toys Pattern

Crochet Unicorn Baby Rattle Natural Toy

by Crochet Feelings Toys – Finished Toy

Bright Crocheted Unicorn Rainbow Mane And Tail

by Dreamy Toys By Kristina – Finished Toy

Crochet Unicorn in a Dress

by Knitting for Emotions – Finished Toy

Unicorn Amigurumi, Licorne, Finished Toy

by Dreamy Toys by Kristina – Finished Toy

Personalized Easter Basket Crochet Rainbow Unicorn

by Home Toys by Galatova – Finished Toy

Unicorn Easter Basket Crochet Pattern

by Briana K Designs

Crochet Pattern Unicorn Toy Easter Egg

by Crochet Gift by Mary

Amigurumi Crochet Unicorn Brooch Pattern

by Crochet Toys Basket

Unicorn Ring Toss Basket Easter Basket Pattern

by Crochet Rox

Crochet Unicorn Lovey Baby Easter Toy

by Cross For Hearts Gifts – Finished Toy

Unicorn Crochet Pattern, Rattle, Unicorn Teether Toy Pattern

by Tikva Patterns

Hatching Unicorn Egg Crochet Pattern

by Sayens Crochet Store

I hope you enjoy this round up – there is a great image below to PIN to your boards, but you can PIN any pic you’d like!

**I am in partnership with Etsy – this post contains affiliate links :)**

Stitch Tutorials Video Tutorials

How to Crochet: Solomon’s Knot | Crochet Video Tutorial for Beginners | Stitch Explorer Series

Welcome stitch explorers! This weeks stitch is called Solomon’s knot. It had me all kinds of tied up in knots, I’m not kidding. I don’t think I’ve ever been so perplexed by a stitch before lol. I plundered through it with determination and now I’m hooked. It’s such an awesome stitch!

This stitch creates the most beautiful open lace pattern that kind of looks like stars to me. Of course, I’ve modified it a bit from the Crochet Bible version, mostly because that version made me want use jump off the Mississippi bridge. Ahah!

The complete video tutorial is at the bottom of the post for all you visual learners out there 🙂

What I changed..

The abbreviation for Solomon’s knot used in the book is “sk.” This was somewhat confusing to me because I normally think of “sk” as “skip” – so for this version of the written pattern, I’m going to use the abbreviation SOL, as Solomon’s knot.

I updated with a foundation single crochet row because it creates a stretchier base, which is great for this stitch because it is a loose and flowy crochet stitch.

Although – If you want to omit this and work just a chain, I recommend using a larger hook – perhaps 3 sizes up from the hook you decided to use for your project. For instance, I am using 4.5 mm hook for my project, then I would want to make my foundation chain at lease a 6.5 or 8 mm to work the chain.

I’ve written out two patterns – one using the foundation single crochet as your foundation row – and one using a chain as the foundation.

The first written pattern is the foundation single crochet and the second will be using a chain to start.

If you want to know how many chains to start and how big your project will be, check out my multiples stitch calculator. This calculator asks you how big you want your project to be, then you enter the multiples and a few other facts, it spits out how big (approximately) your project will be.

Let’s get started!


+ Abbreviations


scsingle crochet
SOLSolomon’s knot
fscfoundation single crochet
dtrdouble treble crochet
chchain
sk stskip stitch
yoyarn over
st(s)stitch(es)

+ Stitch Guide:


(stitches highlighted in pink are clickable with tutorials)

sc – single crochet –

insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo draw through both loops on hook.

dtr – double treble crochet

yo 3 times, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, *yo, draw through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * until you have one loop left on the hook.

fsc – foundation single crochet

to start – ch 2, insert hook in 1st ch. yo, pull up a loop. ch 1, yo, pull through both loops on hook. (1 fsc created)

to create 2nd stitch – *insert hook in bottom 2 loops of the ch 1, yo, pull up a loop. ch 1, yo, pull through both loops on hook* – repeat from * to *

SOL – Solomon’s knot (special stitch)

pull up a long loop (about 1/2 in or 1.27 cm), yo, pull up loop, insert hook around left most leg of chain, yo, pull up a loop (2 loops on hook), yo, pull through 2 loops (that last yo, and pull through 2 is considered a single crochet) (one Solomon’s knot created).


+ Pattern:


Pattern using a foundation single crochet row (recommended)

Foundation Row:

fsc any multiple of 4 + 1 fsc. I used 13 fsc to start my practice swatch.

Row 1:

ch 1, turn.  sc in 1st fsc. *SOL 2, sk 3 fsc, sc in next fsc* – repeat from * to * to end of row.

Row 2:

ch 5, turn. SOL 1 (this one is created at the top of the ch 5), skip (1 sc, 1 SOL), then sc 1 in next sc (which is at the peak – between the SOL’s). *SOL 2, skip (1 SOL, 1 sc, 1 SOL), sc 1 in next sc* – repeat from * to * to end of row (you should have 1 SOL, and 1 sc left). SOL 1, dtr 1 in last sc.

Row 3:

ch 1, turn. sc 1 in next sc. *SOL 2, skip (1 SOL, 1 sc, 1 SOL), sc 1 in next sc,* repeat from * to * (work last sc of repeat into the 5th ch of ch 5.

Rows 4 – X:

repeat rows 2 & 3 until you reach your desired height.

Using a Chain to Start

chain any multiple of 4 + 2 chains to start.

Row 1:

sc in 2nd ch from hook. *SOL 2, sk 3 ch’s, sc in next ch* – repeat from * to * to end of row.

Row 2:

ch 5, SOL 1 (this one is created at the top of the ch 5), skip (1 sc, 1 SOL), then sc 1 in next sc (which is at the peak – between the sol’s). *SOL 2, skip (1 SOL, 1 sc, 1 SOL), sc 1 in next sc* – repeat from * to * to end of row (you should have 1 SOL, and 1 sc left). SOL 1, dtr 1 in last sc.

Row 3:

ch 1, turn. sc 1 in next sc. *SOL 2, skip (1 SOL, 1 sc, 1 SOL), sc 1 in next sc,* repeat from * to * to end of row. (work last sc of repeat into the 5th ch of ch 5).

Rows 4 – X:

repeat rows 2 & 3 until you reach your desired height.

Are you pulling your hair out yet? I hope knot! (see what I did there?) :D.

After you work a few rows of this stitch, I just know you will fall in love with it. Make sure you don’t skip a stitch though – otherwise you will end up with a big hole. :(. I was working this stitch for a few hours, then I held it up to my boyfriend and said “Isn’t this a beautiful stitch!” – he said “Yes, it’s beautiful, but is that big hole supposed to me there?”

I gasped.

Yikes. All that work. I had to rip it back. Don’t be like me. Lay it down on a surface where you will be able to see the pattern through it. I was using white and working on my white countertop – OOPS! lol.

Video tutorial here:

What can I make with the Solomon’s knot?

This is a lacy stitch for sure. I am creating a beach cover-all, but this will work great for open-work scarves, a mesh open-work tank cover, and it would probably make a great market bag!

I hope you enjoy this tutorial, and if you have any questions or comments, please leave them below, I would love to talk crochet!

Cardigans & Ponchos Crochet Fall Free Crochet Patterns Wearables

Navajo Inspired Blanket Cardigan | Free Crochet Pattern | Beginner Friendly

Rebooting this and making it free :). This was my first blanket cardigan pattern, so go easy on me! The pictures are a little funky too, but hey, we work with what we have right?

The inspiration for this pattern was to challenge myself and to create a cozy warm PLUS sized cardigan that looked kinda hippy, but could also dress up nice too.  I also love the Navajo style blankets, and even though this doesn’t have traditional Navajo patterns, my friend Crystal of The Crocheted Baby & Crochet-A-Memory said it reminded her of a Navajo blanket, so I said Yes!  Hence, the name ;). She is a member of the Chocktaw Nation too, so that makes me feel a little better.

I also wanted to make a project easy for a beginner to follow, so don’t be afraid!  You can work this pattern :).  The details on the pattern are below.

So let’s get started!

Enter a chance to win my *ENTRE* PDF pattern collection – use #hashtag #navajoblanketcardigan on your Instagram or Facebook Post & for Facebook, please be sure to tag @stardustgoldcrochet so I will see them! A winner will be chose in November of 2019.


+ Skill Level


Beginner to Easy – this pattern contains only basic stitches. Piecing it together is easy and there is a full color photo tutorial to help you.


+ Materials:


  • Suggested Yarn: All colors in pictured blanket poncho are Yarn Bee Soft Secret (6oz/170g – 300 yds/275m)
  • Suggested Colors: C1 – Ivory C2 – Blue Teal C3 – Cocoa C4 – Cognac C5 – Burgundy
  • Yardage needed: Pattern uses 2 full skeins of cocoa – with a little more of third skein. You only need one skein of each of the other colors and you will have leftovers for those colors unless you choose to make it larger.
  • Hook Size (s): 6mm (J) hook (main body), 5.5 mm (I) hook (sleeves)
  • Scissors
  • Darning Needle
  • Stitch marker(s)
  • 2 Buttons (1.5 – 2”)

+ Abbreviations:


C(1-5) color 1…5
st(s) st(s)
R row
ch chain
sc single crochet
fsc foundation single crochet
dc double crochet
sk skip
st stitch
*…* *crochet instructions between asterisk* repeated as many times as indicated

+ Stitch guide:


sc – single crochet

insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo draw through both loops on hook.

dc – double crochet

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, *yo, draw through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * until you have one loop left on the hook.

dc3tog – double crochet 3 together (decreases by 2)

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw through 2 loops.  *yo, insert hook in next st, yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw through 2 loops* repeat from * to * one more time, yo, draw through all four loops on hook.

fsc – foundation single crochet

create a slip knot.  ch 2, insert hook in 1st chain.  yo, draw up a loop.  ch 1, yo, draw through both loops on hook.  (2nd st) insert hook in bottom two loops of ch 1.  yo, draw up a loop, ch 1, yo, draw through both loops (2 fsc created).


+ Sizing


The stitch counts in this pattern is basically a one size fits most.  It is made to fit a woman size 14 – 16, but will fit smaller sizes too as oversized.  Max measurements it will fit before modifying (if you decide to modify it):         Bust – 41 – 45” / Waist: 36” – 40” / Hips: 45” – 50” / Biceps: 10” – 14”

How to modify size:

Make it longer or shorter:

Reduce or increase the number of  stitches in the foundation chain – maintain an odd number of sts, i.e. (101, 99, 97).

To reduce the bust and hip circumference:

I recommend eliminating Rows 25, 26, 70, 80, 89 & 90. :  That will reduce it by around 4”.

To increase bust & hip circumference:

I recommend adding one sc and one dc row after the same rows above mentioned above.

To reduce or increase armhole size:

Instructions are within pattern.  Making modifications to length will make stitch counts below inaccurate.

You may also like my other free patterns, like the Sunflower Afghan Blocks – You can find that here.


+ Pattern Notes – Please Read


  • All single crochet rows and double crochet rows are worked the exact same throughout the entire pattern unless otherwise indicated (as for armhole rows). You can find those under “special stitches” below.
  • The first stitch of the single crochet rows are worked into the same space as the ch 1 at the beginning of each row.
  • The first stitch of the double crochet rows are worked into the first ch sp of each previous row (unless indicated otherwise)
  • Stitch count is 101 throughout entire main body.
  • I can tell you that I accidentally added and skipped stitches a few times while working this pattern, so make sure to count your stitches occasionally.  I find counting them on the dc rows is easiest.  This pattern is very forgiving though, so don’t fret if your counts are not perfect, just make sure to increase or decrease at the end of the double crochet rows to fix it.  If you find your single crochet row stitches off, – just make sure you end your last stitch with a single crochet until you get back to 101.
  • Ch 2’s count as a st and are included in stitch count.  You will also work the last sc of each sc row into the ch 2.
  • Ch1’s do not count as st and not counted in stitch count.

Notes:
When Crystal was testing this pattern, her gauge was tighter than mine, and her cardigan ended up being shorter compared to mine. I worked very loosely for this pattern. So make sure the gauge matches or you will need to modify your size, or increase your needle size to make it match. The cardigan is meant to be loose and flow, but ultimately, this is yours to do with what you please ;). lol.


+ Special stitches


This pattern consists of repeating rows of a single crochet pattern, and a double crochet pattern. Those stitch patterns are laid out below. The table below will list either “sc” or “dc,” which means to work those rows using these stitch patterns.

Single crochet rows (listed as “sc” in pattern):

*sc 1, ch 1, sk 1* – repeat *…* to end of row. sc in last st of row, ch 2, turn.

Double crochet rows (listed as “dc” in pattern):

 *dc 1 in ch 1 sp, dc 1* – repeat *…* to end of row. ch 1, turn.


+ Pattern:


Main Body (6 mm, J Hook):

R1:  C1 – fsc 101, ch 1, turn.

R2:  C1 – sc 1, ch 2, sk 2, sc 1 in each fsc to end.

using the special stitches, complete the following rows – remember that “sc” and “dc” below refers to the stitch patterns above in the special stitches, here and throughout – unless otherwise indicated.

R3 sc C2
R4 dc C1
R5 sc C3
R6 dc C4
R7 sc C1
R8 dc C5
R9 sc C5
R10 dc C5
R11 sc C4
R12 dc C2
R13 sc C4
R14 dc C3
R15 sc C4
R16 dc C2
R17 sc C5
R18 dc C2
R19 sc C4
R20 dc C2
R21 sc C2
R22 dc C2
R23 sc C1
R24 dc C3
R25 sc C3
R26 dc C3
R27 sc C3
R28 dc C3
R29 sc C1
R30 dc C4
R31 sc C2
R32 dc C4
R33 sc C1
R34 dc C5
R35 sc C5
R36 dc C5
R37 sc C4
R38 dc C3
R39 sc C4
R40 dc C3

R41 (armhole) C2:

Lay piece flat with button hole on your left side.  Measure 5” down edge. Place st marker. Mine was 14 sts and I placed my st marker in the 15th st. 

Measure from stitch marker down 8.5” – 9.0” (or however large you would like your armhole) Place stitch marker.  My armhole was 26 sts including blue st marker below.

Work the sc pattern until you reach your first st marker (mine was 63 sts).  Count the number of sts in your armhole.  Chain that number of sts (mine was 26).

Continue working the sc pattern start working in the 27th st (or where you placed your st marker).

R42 dc C3
R43 sc C4
R44 dc C3
R45 sc C4
R46 dc C5
R47 sc C5
R48 dc C5
R49 sc C1
R50 dc C4
R51 sc C2
R52 dc C4
R53 sc C1
R54 dc C3
R55 sc C3
R56 dc C3
R57 sc C4
R58 dc C2
R59 sc C4
R60 dc C3
R61 sc C3
R62 dc C3
R63 sc C1
R64 dc C4
R65 sc C2
R66 dc C4
R67 sc C1
R68 dc C5
R69 sc C5
R70 dc C5
R71 sc C4
R72 dc C3
R73 sc C4
R74 dc C3

R75 (armhole row) C2:

Repeat instructions for previous armhole, using the same stitch counts. I am wording it like this because yours may be different than mine if you modified the size. Otherwise, use my recommended counts.

R76 dc C3
R77 sc C4
R78 dc C3
R79 sc C4
R80 dc C5
R81 sc C5
R82 dc C5
R83 sc C1
R84 dc C4
R85 sc C2
R86 dc C4
R87 sc C1
R88 dc C3
R89 sc C3
R90 dc C3
R91 sc C3
R92 dc C3
R93 sc C1
R94 dc C2
R95 sc C2
R96 dc C2
R97 sc C4
R98 dc C2
R99 sc C5
R100 dc C2
R101 sc C4
R102 dc C3
R103 sc C4
R104 dc C2
R105 sc C4
R106 dc C5
R107 sc C5
R108 dc C5
R109 sc C1
R110 dc C4
R111 sc C3
R112 dc C1
R113 sc C2

R114:  

with C1 – ch 2, dc in ch sp, ch 2, sk 2, dc remainder of row.  Cut, tie, and weave in all tails.

Sleeves (make 2):

If you want to modify the width or length of the sleeves, you can simply reduce the starting fsc around the wrist – keep the sts an odd number to maintain the pattern – however, modifying it will change st counts below.  Make sure your stitch count on row 56 matches the number of sts surrounding your arm hole for sewing together.

Hook:  I-9 (5.5mm)

R1:  C1 – fsc 35, ch 1.

R2:  sc 35.

complete the following rows using the “sc” and “dc” stitch pattern from special stitches – stitch counts are in last column

R3 sc C2   (35)
R4 dc C1   (35)
R5 sc C3   (35)
R6 dc C4   (35)
R7 sc C1   (35)
R8 dc C5   (35)
R9 sc C5   (35)
R10 dc C5   (35)
R11 sc C4   (35)
R12 dc C2   (35)
R13 sc C4   (35)
R14 dc C3   (35)
R15 sc C4   (35)
R16 dc C2   (35)
R17 sc C3   (35)
R18 dc C2   (35)
R19 sc C3   (35)
R20 dc C3   (35)
R21 sc C3   (35)
R22 dc C3   (35)
R23 sc C4    (35)
R24 dc C3   (35)
R25 sc C4   (35)

note: For the following rows you’ll be making increases on the dc rows – this will add 2 sts to each dc row, except the very last row, which will add an additional dc.  To increase, you will make one extra dc at the beginning and one extra dc in the last st of each dc row.

complete the following rows using the “sc” and “dc” stitch pattern from special stitches.

R26 dc C3   (37) inc
R27 sc C3   (37)
R28 dc C3   (39) inc
R29 sc C3   (39)
R30 dc C3   (41) inc
R31 sc C4   (41)
R32 dc C3   (43) inc
R33 sc C4   (43)
R34 dc C3   (45) inc
R35 sc C3   (45)
R36 dc C3   (47) inc
R37 sc C3   (47)
R38 dc C3   (49) inc
R39 sc C4   (49)
R40 dc C3   (51) inc
R41 sc C4   (51)
R42 dc C3   (53) inc
R43 sc C3   (53)

Notes for Rows 44 & Rows 45 – 56:

R44 – you will complete as normal, however, you will add one extra dc in the last st –  giving you a stitch count of 56 – this count should match the number of stitches surrounding your arm hole.  If you modified the armhole – your stitch counts will be different than what is below.  Just make sure your final row matches the number of sts of your arm hole.

R’s 4556 – the extra stitch will make the single row pattern shift a bit.  please complete pattern and do 1 sc at the end of the row.  Because the sc row pattern is shifted, the dc row will begin in the first sc from previous row, then into the ch sp.  for dc rows – continue working 1 dc in each sc from previous row and 1 dc into each ch sp from prev row.

R44 dc C3   (56) inc(3)
R45 sc C3   (56)
R46 dc C3   (56)
R47 sc C3   (56)
R48 dc C3   (56)
R49 sc C3   (56)
R50 dc C3   (56)
R51 sc C3   (56)
R52 dc C3   (56)
R53 sc C3   (56)
R54 dc C3   (56)
R55 sc C3   (56)
R56 dc C3   (56)

finished with arms. –
cut, tie, and weave in all tails –

Collar:

After working this pattern, I realized it was a little loose on top, so I decided to add a collar on the back side to draw it together.  Here is how to add the collar.  This is adjustable.  You can make it tighter if need be or even taller if you’d like.

With WS facing you (the inside of the cardigan)…

Row 1: insert hook in top of the first dc row, ch 2.  *dc3tog* (this means you work one dc over three sts)– see photo and stitch guide to help you work this stitch. Of course, you can use or create any style of border you’d like :).


+ Assembly:


The next few pages will be how to construct the cardigan and sew it together.

 

Piecing it Together:

Arms

The “wrong” side looks likes this:

The “right” side (outside) looks like this:

With right side facing you…

use the dark brown to whip the main part of the sleeves together, and white to do the cuff. 

Use white to sew the bottom portion of the sleeve.

Sewing the arms to the body

Whip stitch arms to body.  Arms will be right side out when you insert them into the armhole.  Align the seam of the arm, to the bottom of the armhole.  Stitch through all four loops (2 top loops of the arm, 2 top loops of the armhole as pictured below).

 

Adding the tassels

For the tassels, I used varying rows of all white and a mix of all five colors.  Measure out pieces in 12” strips using 5 strands.  For the white, use 5 strands of white.  For the mixed, use 5 strands, one of each color.  Fold them in half.  Insert hook into where you will create the tassel.  Lay the center of the strands over the hook and wrap around the hook as best you can.  pull through half way.  Insert your fingers into the loop and draw through all the strands pulling it tight.

I spaced them as pictured below – inserting into the bottom most space, skipping one of the blue dot, and inserting into the next.  Alternating colored strands with white strands.

Adding the buttons

Button placement is your preference on how you’d like your cardigan to lay.  I place my outside button on my right shoulder.  The inside button is on the inside left shoulder (not mirror image, I mean right and left as if I am wearing it, not looking at it).

Space button about an inch from top of armhole as pictured here:

Congratulations!  You’re finished!

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Navajo Blanket Cardigan

Also, the sleeves are fairly long. I like long sleeves, and the cuff is able to fold up nicely too. If you want shorter sleeves, I recommend removing rows closest to the top of the sleeve. There are more detailed instructions on how to do this inside the pattern :).

I hope you enjoy this pattern! Please tag me or make a project so I can see what lovely colors you all come up with! <3

PDF’S are available on Etsy & Ravelry – click photos to take you there.

Navajo Blanket Cardigan
2018-02-26 17.09.14
Crochet Free Crochet Patterns Motifs & Squares Pattern Tutorials Spring Stitch Tutorials summer Video Tutorials

Sunflower Afghan Crochet Pattern – Afghan Blocks | Free Crochet Pattern Tutorial | Saturday Stitch Explorer

Something inspired me to make a square.  I never make squares! I do <3 sunflowers though, and thinking of ideas on how to create a square that can be used for hats, scarves, pillows, crochet afghans, or just about anything you can think of.  Summer Sunflowers is born!

You can sew these together to create a beautiful sunflower crochet afghan.

I also wanted to create a pattern that can translate well with any hook size and any yarn size you want – one where you can change up the colors to create other pretty flowers too. I grabbed some Lion Brand Wool-Ease (Fisherman) and Hometown USA to create a giant square – I’m in LOVE with this giant square. I think I”m going to make an afghan with them, and also a retro boho bag with them (there is that retro again) ;).

The summer sunflowers square is made up of a few basic stitches. You will learn to create a treble crochet three together, which is a decrease stitch, and a magic circle, which is a fun way to start a project in the round. Video tutorial is at the bottom of the post.

A big thank you to my pattern testers for this one, who worked it up fast! This pattern does work up suprisingly fast. I made 4 squares in less than an hour, and the big one worked up in 20 minutes <3. Can’t beat that!

Sara Marsh over at Sunflower Cottage Crochet worked up this beauty for me. Her blog is fairly new, so go show her some love and support – she has a Facebook Page too. Thank you Sara for the fast turn-around and all the wonderful notes.

My second tester is Janice Penner and she gave some great feedback! Here is the square she created.

So, let’s get started!

PDF is available on Ravelry here for $3.99

Are you ready to make it? Let’s do this!


+ Gauge:


10 dc = 2″ (5 cm)


+ Materials:


Suggested Yarn:

Any 3 weight yarn – I used Scheepjes Merino Soft

for the big square I used Hometown USA in Fresno Tweed & Providence Pink & Wool-Ease Thick n’ Quick in Fisherman with a 9mm hook

Colors:

A: Dark Brown (609) (or Fresno Tweed), B: Yellow (640) (or Providence Pink), C: White (600) (or Fisherman)

Suggested Yarn Details:

50% Superwash Merino Wool, 25% Micro, 25% Acrylic – 50 grams = 105 m

Yardage Needed:

12 grams or 0.4 oz

~ Hook Size: Cowl:  4.5 mm (for small squares) 9 mm (for larger squares)

~ Scissors

~ Darning Needle


+ Stitch guide:


Magic circle video tutorial here

Underlined stitches are clickable

sc – single crochet

insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo draw through both loops on hook.

dc – double crochet

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, *yo, draw through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * until you have one loop left on the hook.

tr3tog – treble crochet 3 together (decreases by 2)

*yo 2 times, insert hook in next st, yo, draw up a loop (yo draw through 2 loops – 2 times) * – repeat from * to * 2 more times. yo, draw through all loops on hook.

click photo to hook it!

+ Abbreviations:


sc single crochet
tr3tog treble crochet 2 together (a decrease)
dc double crochet
t-ch turning chain
st(s) stitches
sp space
ch chain
ch sp chain space
rnd round
*…* *repeat* instructions between *…*  

Finished Measurements:

Small Square: 4.25″ (10.79 cm ) to 4.5″ (11.43 cm)

Large Square: Approximately 11″ (30 cm)


+ Pattern Notes – Please Read


  • Mark the 1st st of each round (helps for where to make your joins)
  • 1st stitch of each round is made in base of t-ch, unless otherwise indicated.
  • Joins are made in 1st stitch of round – unless otherwise indicated.
  • Turning chains do not count as stitches – unless otherwise indicated.

PDF is available on Ravelry here for $3.99


+ Pattern:


Using 4.5 mm hook & color A create a magic circle, or ch 4, and join ends, then…

Rnd 1ch 2, dc 15 into ring, join. (15)

Rnd 2ch 1, sc 2 in sp between dc below, *sc 1 in sp between next dc’s, sc 2 in sp between next dc’s* repeat from * to * to end.  sc 1 in between last dc and dc directly below ch 1 from beg of rnd. Join. (24)

Rnd 3ch 1, sc 1 in each st around.  Change to Color B when joining with sl st into 1st sc of round. Cut Color A, weave in tails. (24).

Rnds 4ch 4 (this will serve as your first treble in the tr3tog, so begin the 2nd part of the tr3tog in the next st – not the base of the chain) *tr3tog, ch 5,* repeat from * to * 8 times.  Join in top of 1st tr3tog. (8 tr3tog & 8 ch 5’s)

Rnd 5ch 1, sc 1 in same as join, [*yo, insert hook in base of leftmost treble from tr3tog below, yo, draw up a long loop* – repeat from * to * 3 times total.  Then, *yo, insert hook in base of next treble, yo, draw up a long loop* repeat from * to * – 3 times total.  yo, pull through all 13 loops on hook (1 cluster created).  ch 1sc 1 in top of tr3tog], repeat from [ to ] 8 times total.  (on last cluster, 2nd ½ of will be in the base of ch 4). Complete last sc of repeat with Color C – that last sc will act as your join. (24)

Below is where you will will complete your last sc of the repeat, and change colors.

Rnd 6:  ch 1, sc 2 (mark the 1st sc) in 1st st. *sc 2 in ch sp, sc 2 in cluster**, sc 2 in tr3tog, * – repeat from * to * to end, ending last repeat at ** then, sc 2 around last visible ch.  Join in 1st sc of rnd (marked stitch). (50).

note: if you don’t have 50 stitches at this point, don’t fret. Just frog (pull it out) around 10 or so stitches and add the extras in there somewhere, it won’t throw off the pattern as long as you end this round with 50 sc.

Rnds 7:  ch 2, make first stitch of repeat in base of ch 2.  *dc 2, ch 1, dc 2 (in same st), dc 12* – repeat from * to * 3 times.  dc 1 in each of next 10 sts.  Join in 1st dc of rnd (make join behind dc in bar (see photo), sl st in next back bar of next dc). (66)

Rnd 8ch 2, [*(yo, insert hook in ch sp, yo, pull up a long loop) 3 times, yo, pull through all loops, ch 1* – repeat from * to * 3 times total in same ch sp.  bpdc around next 16 dc] – repeat from [ to ] – 2 more times.

then, repeat from * to * 3 times in same ch sp, then bpdc around next 12 dc.  bpdc around ch 3.  bpdc around next 2 dc (try to enclose the ch 2 from beg of rnd on last bpdc – see video for help) – Join using an invisible join (also in video)

cut and tie off, weave in all tails!

You can make several of these and tie them together to make a blanket, a bag, a pillow – even a top!  


Congratulations!  You’re finished!

PDF is available on Ravelry here for $3.99


I’d love to see your work! Use hashtags on FB & IG

#stardustgoldcrochet #summersunflowerscrochet #summersunflowersgrannysquare #sunflowerafghanblock

Thanks for stopping by and making beautiful things with me,

If you’d like to collaborate with me, please send me a message or leave a comment, I would love to work with you!

All photos and pattern are property of Stardust Gold Crochet.

Feel free to sell items created from this pattern, but please do not copy, distribute, or sell this pattern as your own.

Beanies & Berets Crochet Fall Free Crochet Patterns Pattern Tutorials Scarves & Cowls Video Tutorials Wearables

Maya Classy Cowl & Beanie | Free Crochet Pattern Tutorial | Multiple Sizes

The Maya Classy Cowl & Beanie is a simple classic style that will work well dressing it up or dressing it down. 😉.  To create this set, I used Lion Brand Yarn in the colorway Acadia. Of course, you can use any worsted weight yarn for this set, and even change up the colors! One of my testers used a nice grey and red for the solid half double crochet rows, it turned out really nice.

Tammy’s Maya Cowl

The cowl is written for one size, and easily adjustable by reducing or increasing your foundation row.

The beret is written for 3 sizes – small, medium & large. 😊.

There is a video tutorial at the bottom of the post that will help you work the first few rows to get the hang of the stitches used in the pattern :).

It’s long enough to double up too!

So, let’s get started!

Add to your Ravelry queue & favorites – please make a project page if you make it! & show some <3 on Etsy

The Maya Cowl is so easy to modify and combines simple stitches so it’s great for a beginner! You will learn to a half double crochet decrease, and several other decrease stitches while working this pattern. If you see an underlined stitch in the stitch guide, that means you can click it, and it will take you to the full video tutorial on how to complete that stitch.

Are you ready to make it? Let’s do this!


+ Gauge:


Cowl: 10 fsc + rows 1 thru 5  = 3 x 2.25


+ Materials:


Suggested Yarn:

I used Lion Brand Heartland yarn in the colorway Acadia

Suggested Yarn Details:

100% Acrylic – 5oz/142g – 251 yds/230 m per skein

Yardage Needed:

3 skeins or 753 yards

~ Hook Size: Cowl:  5.5 (I-9) Beret:  4.0 mm (G), & 5.0 mm (H)

~ Scissors

~ Darning Needle


+ Stitch guide:


sc – single crochet

insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo draw through both loops on hook.

sc2tog – single crochet 2 together (a decrease)

(insert hook in next st.  yo, draw up a loop) twice, yo draw through all loops on hook.

hdc – half double crochet

yo, insert hook in next st, yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw through all three loops on hook.

hdc2tog – half double crochet 2 together

(yo, insert hook in next st.  yo, draw up a loop) twice, yo draw through all loops on hook. 

fsc – foundation single crochet

create a slip knot.  ch 2, insert hook in 1st chain.  yo, draw up a loop.  ch 1, yo, draw through both loops on hook.  (2nd st) insert hook in bottom two loops of ch 1, yo draw up a loop.  ch 1, yo, draw through both loops (2 fsc created).


+ Abbreviations:


sc single crochet
sc2tog single crochet 2 together (a decrease)
hdc half double crochet
hdc2tog half double crochet 2 together (a decrease)
fsc foundation single crochet
sk st skip stitch
st(s) stitches
sp space
ch chain
ch sp chain space
rnd round
*…* *repeat* instructions between *…*

+ Size(s):


Cowl:  One size – easily adjustable.  Please refer to notes within pattern to adjust for child or toddler.

Beret:  Adult Small, Medium, Large.

Finished Measurements:

Cowl:  40” long unseemed, 12″ tall

Beret fits:  small 19-20”, med 21-22”, large 23-34”


+ Pattern Notes – Please Read


How to Read This Pattern

  • Cowl is worked flat, then seamed.
  • Beret is worked in rounds and uses a foundation single crochet row to start.
  • Beret: Stitch counts are at the end of each row/round in (parentheses).
  • Cowl: Stitch count is same throughout.
  • Stitch counts for last few rows of Beret are not listed because you may want to end and sew at a certain point – it’s up to you.

Cowl will have 118 sts per row throughout.  

Include the ch 1’s within the * … * repeats in your stitch count.  The turning chains are not counted in stitch count.

PDF is available on Ravelry here for $3.99


+ Pattern:


Cowl:

Using 5.5 mm hook…

Row 1: Fsc 118 (or any even number of stitches).

Row 2:ch 2, turn. (begin 1ST st in 1st fsc) *hdc2tog, ch 1* repeat from * to * across entire row.

Row 3:ch 1, turnhdc2tog beginning in 1st hdc2tog from Row 2 (complete second half of hdc2tog around the ch 1 sp) ch 1.

*hdc2tog (working into next hdc2tog from row 2 & into ch 1 sp), ch 1* – repeat to end.

(when you come to the end, work last hdc2tog into last hdc2tog of prev row and around turning chain.)

Rows 4 | 5 | 6 | 7: Repeat row 3.

Row 8: ch 1, turn.  working into the top two loops of each ch/st; hdc 1 in each st/ch across entire row.

Row 9: ch 1, turnhdc 1 in each st across.

Rows 10: Repeat row 2, except begin 1st st in 1st hdc from prev row.

Row 11 | 12: Repeat row 3.

Row 13:  Repeat row 8.

Row 14:  Repeat row 9.

Rows 15:  Repeat row 2. except begin 1st st in 1st hdc from prev row.

Rows 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20:  Repeat row 3.

Row 21:  Repeat row 8.

Row 22:  Repeat row 9.

Row 23:  Repeat row 2. except begin 1st st in 1st hdc from prev row.

Rows 24 | 25:  Repeat row 3.

Row 26:  ch 1, sc entire row (work into the top two loops of each st/ch).

Tie off, leave 18” long tail for sewing.  Weave in all other tails.


+ Assembly:


Align short edges by ringing ends together and sew up using the long tail.  You can use a whip stitch or running stitch.

PDF is available on Ravelry here for $3.99


+ Pattern:


Beret:

Gauge:

6 fsc = 2″

Pattern Notes:

  • Joins are made in 1st stitch of round.
  • 1st stitch of each round is created in same as join.
  • When working the rounds that contain sc’s, always work into the top two loops of each stitches/chains, not into the chain spaces.
  • Sizes adjustments are listed as (S, M, L)
  • Pattern works in even number, you can adjust to fit your size or follow instructions below for adult S, M, L (sizes are approximations)

Using G (4 mm hook)

Rnd 1:  Fsc (S) 68, (M) 72, (L) 74, join, ch 1.

Using H hook (5 mm hook)

Rnd 2:  *hdc2tog, ch 1* – repeat to end, join. (68, 72, 74)

Rnd 3ch 1, *sc 1 in each of next 2 sts, sc 2 in next* – repeat to end. Join. (92, 96, 98)

Rnd 4:  ch 1, turn. Repeat rnd 2. (92, 96, 98)

Rnd 5ch 1, *sc 1 in each of next 3 stitches, sc 2 in next st* – repeat to end. Join. (116, 120, 122)

Rnd 6ch 1, turn. Repeat rnd 2. Join. (116, 120, 122)

Rnd 7ch 1, sc entire rnd. Join. (116, 120, 122)

Rnd 8ch 1, turn. Repeat rnd 2. (116, 120, 122)

Rnd 9:  repeat rnd 7. (116, 120, 122)

Rnd 10ch 1, turn. Repeat rnd 2. (116, 120, 122)

Rnd 11ch 1, *sc in next 3 sts. sc2tog* – repeat to end. (92, 96, 98)

Rnd 12ch 1, turn. *hdc2tog two times, ch 1* – repeat to end. Join. (68, 72, 74)

Rnd 13ch 1, sc entire rnd. (68, 72, 74)

Rnd 14ch 1, turn. Repeat rnd 2. (68, 72, 74)

Rnd 15:  Repeat rnd 13. (68, 72, 74)

Rnd 16: ch 1, turn. *hdc2tog twice, ch 1* – repeat to end. Join. (50, 54, 56)

Rnd 17ch 1, sc entire rnd. (50, 54, 56)

Rnd 18ch 1, turn. hdc2tog entire rnd. (23, 27, 29)

Rnd 19ch 1, sc entire rnd (23, 27, 29)

Rnd 20:  Repeat rnd 19. (23, 27, 29)

Rnd 21ch 1, turn. Repeat rnd 2. (22, 26, 28)

Rnd 22ch 1, *sc 1, sc2tog* – repeat to end, ending with sc in last st. (14, 18, 20)

Rnd 23ch 1, sc2tog entire rnd. (5, 9, 11)

Rnd 24 (medium and large only):  ch 1, sc2tog entire rnd. (4)

(I went for as long as I could, so this round isn’t completely essential

Tie off, and weave in tail, closing hole while you do.

Use starting tail for to join the fsc row together, weave in tail.


Congratulations!  You’re finished!


I’d love to see your work! Use hashtags on FB & IG

#stardustgoldcrochet #mayacowl #mayaberet

PDF is available on Ravelry here for $3.99

Thanks for stopping by and making beautiful things with me,

If you’d like to collaborate with me, please send me a message or leave a comment, I would love to work with you!

All photos and pattern are property of Stardust Gold Crochet.

Feel free to sell items created from this pattern, but please do not copy, distribute, or sell this pattern as your own.

Crochet Stitch Tutorials Video Tutorials

How to Crochet: Modern Raised Ripple Stitch | Video Tutorial for Beginners | Stitch Explorer Series

Welcome to the Saturday Stitch Explorer series! This week I’m revising the Raised Ripple Stitch.  Originally, I was going to demonstrate it as it is written, straight out of the book, but after completing the first six rows, I wasn’t happy with it at all. I changed it up a bit using modern techniques and made it a bit easier (in my humble opinion). The edges have fewer gaps for easier sewing! Less math, more fun!

This is the fifth and final of the five stitches we are going to learn leading up to creating the coolest 5 stitch project ever! You can come back to this link and explore the rest of the stitches, there is so much to learn!

What we’ve learned so far are the

  • Alternating spike stitch: tutorial is here.
  • Open Ridge stitch: tutorial is here.
  • Pique Stitch: tutorial is here.
  • Bead stitch: tutorial is here.

On to the modern version I created of the Raised Ripple Stitch…

As a designer & teacher, I tend to ask myself these questions:

“How easy will this stitch be to sew together for a cardigan, pillow, or sweater?”

“Are there gaps along the border?”

“Is this the easiest way to make this stitch?”

So I came across a few issues and decided to make it easier to understand, and no more gaps.  Here I am giving you’re the original wording from the book, and after that, I’ve written my newer, updated, and more modern version of this classic stitch.

And I must say that I have an aversion to counting turning chains as stitches or using them in the design for flat works.  I was taught a stitch is a stitch, a turning chain is a turning chain, but there are so many ways to crochet, and neither is better or worse, but those pesky gaps! Me no likey those.

This is the original raised ripple stitch – my version is below this….

Original Raised Ripple:

Chain any number of odd number of stitches (add 2 for foundation chain)

Row 1:

1 dc in 4th ch from hook, 1 c in each ch to end, turn.

Row 2:

1 ch, skip first st, 1 sc in each st, ending 1 sc in 3rd of 3 ch, turn.

Row 3:

3 ch, sk first sc, *1 frtr around dc below next sc, skip this sc, 1 dc in next sc, repeat from *, ending 1 dc in 1 ch turn.

Row 4:

as row 2

Row 5:

3 ch, skip first sc, *1 dc in next sc, 1 frtr around dc below next sc, repeat from *, ending 1 frtr around dc below 1 ch, turn.

Repeat rows 2 – 5.

I don’t know about you, but that just seems really complicated and confusing.  When I write patterns, I like to write them abbreviated, but if you were to speak it aloud, it would form a cohesive sentence of some kind, you know what I mean? lol. 

Here is my version modern crochet techniques:

Updated with a foundation double crochet row.  I also made sure that if you are working into stitches, not chains (easier to count your stitches!).   I reduced the turning chain count from a chain 3 to a chain 2 (to even the edges out and remove the gaps), and updated the frtr (front raised treble) to fptr (front post treble) – these are the same stitch, but most designers I know use the term post instead of raised.

This stitch uses all three of the basic stitches in a four row repeat. The single crochet, double crochet, and treble crochet.

The pattern goes as follows:

Tasha’s modern crochet version of the Raised Ripple Stitch:

+ Abbreviations

scsingle crochet
dcdouble crochet
fdcfoundation double crochet
fptrfront post treble crochet
chchain
sk stskip stitch
yoyarn over
st(s)stitch(es)

+ Stitch Guide:

sc – single crochet

insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo draw through both loops on hook.

dc – double crochet

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, *yo, draw through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * until you have one loop left on the hook.

fdc – foundation double crochet

create a slip knot, ch 3, step 1:  yo insert hook in first ch, *yo, pull up a loop, ch 1, yo, pull through 2 loops until one loop is left on hook*  step 2:  yo, insert hook in bottom two loops of ch 1 you created in step 1, then repeat step 1 from * to *

FPtrfront post treble crochet

yo 2 times, insert hook around indicated st (from front to back and out the front again).  yo and draw through two loops until only one loop on hook remains on hook.

+ Pattern:

Row 1:

fdc 20 (or any even number of stitches)

Row 2:

ch 1, turn.  sc 1 in each dc across.

Row 3:

ch 2, turn, dc in 1st sc, *fptr around dc below next sc, sk st behind fptr, dc in next* – repeat from * to * across, ending with 1 dc in last st.

Row 4:

repeat 2.

Row 5:

ch 2, turn.  sk 1st sc.  *fptr around 1st visible dc 2 rows down, sk st behind fptr, dc in next* – repeat from * to * across (one stitch left), fptr around last dc from 2 rows down, dc in last st.

Rows 6 – X:

repeat rows 2 – 5.

I hope this makes this beautiful stitch easier to learn for all you beginners out there!  I know learning to crochet can be sooooo confusing.  When I was learning to write patterns, I discovered how different designers worded their stitches differently.  I was longing for some uniformity across the board, but discovered it’s a little about writing style, and a little about how that person learned to crochet.

It’s an age old craft passed down from generation to generation, and things change, new things are discovered, and as times change, it’s great to learn how things are evolving. Growing and learning together. I love learning new techniques <3. I hope you do too!

Video tutorial here:

What should I make with the Modern Raised Ripple Stitch?

This is a puffy raised stitch and I think it can cross over well to all sorts of project, like using a chunky yarn for a blanket, or scarf. It would even make a great pillow cover, and if you’re feeling daring, it may even translate over to a sweater :).

I hope you enjoy this tutorial, and if you have any questions or comments, please leave them below, I would love to talk crochet!