Crochet Fall Wearables

RAINY DAZE Oversized Crochet Poncho ~ FREE crochet pattern ~ super cozy crochet poncho

Who doesn’t love a cozy comfy rainy-day? I wanted to create something like Flashdance and Old Navy met at a coffee-house, drank too much coffee and had a crochet poncho baby!

I hope you enjoy making it, it is very simple to create. 😊

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Crochet Fall Free Crochet Patterns Wearables

Winter Blush Beanie & Scarf – Easy Free Crochet Pattern Perfect Project for Beginner

I’m so excited about this new pattern.  I wanted to create something soft, in the latest 2018 Fall colors.  It’s soft, warm, and uses creative stitches that translates easily from scarf to beanie to create the perfect color coordinated set.  Available in sizes:  Toddler, Child, Adult: Small, Medium, Large.

If you have any questions about this pattern, please leave a comment below.  Someone else may have the same questions, we can answer them together.

Printed PDF includes chart for scarf is available on Ravelry & Etsy

I would love to see your finished patterns, if you have Instagram, Facebook, or a blog, please use hashtag #stardustgoldcrochet #WinterBlushBeanie.  Thank you!  Let’s get started!  😉

 

+Skill Level:

Easy or ambitious beginner – stitch videos can help you work this pattern for sure!

+Materials:

Suggested Yarn:

I Love This Cotton!

color in photos:  Warm Blush

Yarn Details:

100% Cotton.  (4) weight, 3.5 oz (100 g), 180 yards (165 m) per skein.

Yarn Substitution:

visit yarnsub.com

Care:

Machine washable and dryable.

Yarn Weight:

Suggested yarn is worsted, but it is considered a light aran, so if you use anything other than suggested yarn, I would recommend going with a 3 (light worsted).

Gauge:

8.5 rows of simple ribbing for brim = 2″

Yardage Needed:

a little under 780 yards for scarf, 180 (apprx.) for hat – total of 5-6 skeins at 180 yards per skein.

Hook Size (scarf):

6.5 mm (K) hook

Hook Size (Beanie):

4 mm (G), 5.0 mm (H)

Scissors

Darning Needle

+Size(s):

Toddler, Child, Adult:  Small, Medium, Large

Pattern works in multiples of 3 + 1

+Finished Measurements (in/cm):

  Will Fit Sizes
Beanie:
Toddler 17- 18” (58.42)
Child 19-20” ( cm)
Adult
Small 20 – 21” ( cm)
Medium 22” ( cm)
Large 23” ( cm)
Scarf (with border): 6” wide x 71” tall

+How to Read This Pattern

Stitch counts are in parentheses at the end of each row. Remember to count your stitches 😉.

It is highly recommended you use the suggested yarn, some of my pattern testers used acrylic and found it to throw the gauge off for the beanie.  The scarf is flexible, but if you would like a matching set, use recommended yarn or equivalent from the yarnsub site.  Suggested yarn is considered a light aran.

+Abbreviations:

sc – single crochet FPhtr – front post half treble crochet
fsc – foundation single crochet beg – beginning
rvsc – reverse single crochet rnd – round
dc – double crochet st(s) – stitch(es)
dc2tog – double crochet 2 together ch(s) – chain(s)
dc3tog – double crochet 3 together *…* – repeat from * to * however many times indicated
hdc – half double crochet lp(s) – loop(s)
hdc2tog – half double crochet 2 together yo – yarn over
hdc3tog – half double crochet 3 together ch sp – chain space
htr – half treble crochet prev – previous

Note:  Stitches in PINK are are clickable, and will take you to my easy to follow video tutorials on how to create these stitches.

+Stitch Guide

(click on underlined heading for full video stitch tutorials)

sc – single crochet

insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo draw through both loops on hook.

hdc – half double crochet

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw through all three loops on hook.

hdc2tog half double crochet 2 together

yo, insert hook in indicated st.  yo, draw up a loop.  yo, insert hook in next st, yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw through all five loops on hook.

fsc – foundation single crochet

create a slip knot.  ch 2, insert hook in 1st chain.  yo, draw up a loop.  ch 1, yo, draw through both loops on hook.  (2nd st) insert hook in bottom two loops of ch 1, yo draw up a loop.  ch 1, yo, draw through both loops (2 fsc created).

hdc3tog – half double crochet 3 together

yo, insert hook in indicated st.  yo, draw up a loop, *yo, insert hook in next st, yo, draw up a loop* – repeat one more time, then yo, and draw through all loops on hook.

rvsc – reverse single crochet

don’t turn.  rvsc works left to right.  pull out loop on hook just a tad.  insert hook in indicated st.  yo, draw up a loop (make it loose), yo, draw through both loops on hook.

htr – half treble crochet

yo twice, insert hook in indicated st.  yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw through 2 loops, yo, draw through 3 loops.

dc – double crochet

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, *yo, draw through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * until you have one loop left.

dc2tog – double crochet 2 together

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop.  yo, draw through 2 loops.  yo, insert hook in next st, yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw through 2 loops.  yo, draw through all three loops on hook.

dc3tog – double crochet 3 together

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw through 2 loops.  *yo, insert hook in next st, yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw through 2 loops* repeat from * to * one more time, yo, draw through all four loops on hook.

FPhtr – front post half treble crochet

yo twice, insert hook around indicated st(s).  yo, draw up a loop, yo, draw through 2 loops, yo, draw through all 3 loops on hook.

+Pattern:

Note:  pattern works in multiples of 3 + 1

+Scarf

Using a 6.5 mm (K) hook, and 2 strands of yarn… 

Note:  1st stitch of each round is made in same as chain, unless otherwise indicated.

Row 1:  fsc 19

Row 2:  ch 3, turn.  sk 1, dc 3 in next st.  *sk 2, dc 3 in next st* – repeat from * to * to end of row.  sk 1 st, dc in last st.  (19 sts – chain 3 does not count in stitch count for this row)

Row 3:  ch 3, turn.  sk 1st st.  *dc3tog**, ch 2* – repeat from * to * to end of row ending at **.  ch 1, 1 dc around ch 3 (not in the top of the stitch, but around it).  (19 sts) (ch 3 at beg of row will count in your stitch count for this row)

Row 4:  ch 1, turn.  sc 2 in ch 1 sp.  *sc 1 in top of dc3tog**, sc 2  in next ch 2 sp* – repeat from * to * to end of row, ending at **.  sc around (not in) dc at end of prev row. (19 sts)

Row 5:  ch 1, turn.  *sc 1 in 1st and 2nd sts, FPhtr around dc3tog from prev row*, sk 1 st* (skipped st is behind FPhtr) – repeat from * to * end of row, ending at **.  sk 1, sc 1 in last st.  (19 sts)

Rows 6 – X:  Repeat rows 2-5 until you have 25 diamonds (25 – 4 row repeats or 101 rows total)

You can make this scarf as long as you want by repeating rows 2 – 5 to desired length.

Don’t break yarn.

 

Scarf Border:

Top border:  Continue working with existing yarn and hook & ch 1, we will work from left to right and create reverse single crochets.  Insert hook in last completed st of row, yo, pull up a loop.  yo, pull through both loops (1st reverse sc created).  Continue working rvsc, left to right until you complete 19 (or the stitch count you decided on to start)

Side 1 of border:  ch1, turn. (you’ll be working right to left) *hdc 1 in 1st two side of rows, hdc 2 in next end of row ch sp, hdc 2 in next end of row ch sp* – *repeat* from * to * ending at row two by completing 2 hdc in last ch sp.

Join in end of row 1 with slip stitch.

Bottom border:  ch 1, turn. (you’ll be working left to right) 19 rvsc.

Side 2 of border:  Turn.  (you should be working down the other end of the scarf now) hdc 1 in the side of dc ch sp from row 1, then *hdc 2 in next ch sp, hdc 2 in next ch sp, 1 hdc in top of each next two rows* repeat from * to * to row 100.

Join with slip stitch in bar of rvsc. Cut, tie off, weave in tails.

 + Beanie

Using 4 mm (G) hook and one strand of yarn.

Sizing (using recommended yarn):

will fit sizes:

Toddler – 17-18”

Child – 19-20”

Adult Small –  20-21”

Adult Medium – 22”

Adult Large – 23-25”

If you are using the recommended yarn you can skip to the pattern.

+The following notes are for those using acrylic or anything other than the recommended yarn.+

Sizing for listed stitch counts will only be consistent if you maintain the proper gauge, and use the recommended yarn.  If you use anything other than the suggested yarn, you will need to match gauge of brim as shown in order to obtain the proper sizing.  The cotton I used has a good stretch to it.  I created medium size (as pictured) which fits average 22” head circumference (my head measures 22.5”).  I worked 96 rows for the band, and it measured around 18” prior to joining, which means it stretched about 4” and fits very gentle.  The fit of the brim is meant to be slightly loose, not super snug.

I learned from my testers that acrylic yarn doesn’t seem to stretch like the recommended yarn (or similar cotton), and the band seemed tight to them – so gauge and yarn choice is very important in this pattern for proper fit. 

Making adjustments is easy, and I’ll walk you through it here.

How to adjust for using acrylic yarn or any yarn other than suggested yarn, or different than average head circumference:

Adjusting the Brim Ribbing:

The entire pattern works in multiples of 3.  Simply work the number of rows you need to reach your desired circumference by working in multiples of 3 – here is a range of multiples of 3:  81, 84, 87, 90, 93, 96, 99, 102, 105, 108, 111, and I highlighted what I used for this pattern the first being toddler, then child, small, medium, large.  Remember to account for stretch, so if you are making a toddler hat, and the toddlers head measures 18” – create a band that around 16.5-17”.  A good way to test the stretch is take a ruler and lay it down.  Place one end of the band at 0 and stretch it out.  What is the difference between how wide it is just laying flat and how wide it is when stretched?  Also keep in mind, some yarns will stretch with wear – especially cotton.

Adjusting the Top of Beanie:

Because the pattern works in multiples of 3 – there will be no changes in the pattern from rounds 1 to 14.

Rounds 15 – 18:

work these rounds as close to the pattern as possible – you should only need to make minor adjustments

For the decrease rounds 19 – 22:

Rnd 19:  Decrease by 8 sts, using hdc.  If you are making a child/toddler, use sc.

Rnds 20 – 22:  Decrease by 6 – 7 sts each rnd using hdc for adult , or sc for child/toddler – until you have a small enough opening to easily sew together.

+Pattern:

Stitch counts listed in pattern as follows:

(toddler, child, small, medium, large)

Brim Ribbing:

Simple ribbing pattern;  work the slip stitch rows very loose, especially if you are using an acrylic yarn (which I don’t recommend)

Ch 7

Row 1:  sc in 2nd ch from hook and across. (6)

Row 2:  (no ch 1) turn, (very loose) sl st in each sc.  (6)

Row 3:  ch 1, turn.  sc in each sl st. (6).

(this can be a little tricky, but as long as you keep your stitches loose, you will be okay)

Rows 4 – x:  repeat rows 2 & 3 until you reach (81, 87, 93, 96, 99)

Joining:

Bring sides together with “wrong” side facing out (the right side is the side with the V ribbing).  sl st through both sides in one loop (6 sl st).

Don’t break yarn.

Top of Beanie:

Note:  1st stitch of each round is made in same place as ch st, unless otherwise indicated.

Using 4 mm (G) hook

ch 1, turn, and flip band so “V” rib pattern is facing you (this will be your right side(RS))

Round 1:  sc 1 in top of each row of brim until you reach beg of rnd.  Join with sl st in top of 1st sc from beg of rnd. (81, 87, 93, 96, 99)

Using 5 mm (H) hook

Round 2:  ch 2, hdc 2 in same st (creates a hdc3 V)  *sk 2 sts, hdc 3 in next st* – repeat from * to * until you reach beg of rnd, sk last 2 sts.  Join in top ch of ch 2 from beg of rnd. (81, 87, 93, 96, 99)

Round 3:  ch 2, hdc2tog (ch 2 & hdc 2tog creates a hdc3tog cluster), ch 2, *hdc3tog, ch2* – repeat from * to * until beg of rnd.  Join in top ch of ch 2 from beg of rnd. (do not count chain stitch in count for this row) (81, 87, 93, 96, 99)

Round 4:  ch 1, *sc 1 in top of cluster, sc 2 in ch 2 sp* – repeat from * to * to beg of rnd.  Join in top of sc from beg of rnd. (81, 87, 93, 96, 99)

Round  5:  ch 1, FPhtr around the cluster from rnd 3 (enclosing the ch 2 with the hdc2tog directly below the ch 1).  *sk st behind FPhtr, sc in each of next 2 sts, FPhtr around cluster from rnd 3* – repeat from * to * to beg of rnd.  (Two stitches left)  sc in each of last 2 sts.  Join in top of FPhtr from beg of rnd. (81, 87, 93, 96, 99)

Round 6:  ch 2 (counts as hdc), hdc 2 in top of FPhtr from prev round.  hdc 3 in top of each FPhtr until you reach beg of rnd.  Join in top of ch 2 from beg of rnd.  (81, 87, 93, 96, 99)

Round 7:  ch 1, hdc3tog in 1st hdc from prev rnd.  ch 2, *hdc3tog, ch 2* – repeat from * to * until you reach beg of rnd.  Join in top of hdc3tog from beg of rnd.  (81, 87, 93, 96, 99)

Round 8:  ch 1, *sc in hdc3tog, sc 2 in ch 2 sp* – repeat from * to * until you reach beg of rnd. Join in top of sc from beg of rnd. (81, 87, 93, 96, 99)

Round 9:  ch 1, FPhtr around hdc3tog & chain from two rnds down, sk st (skipped st is same st where ch 1 is), *sc in each of next 2 sts, FPThtr around next hdc3tog from two rnds down, sk st* – repeat from * to * until you reach beg of rnd.  (two stitches left)  sc in each of last 2 sts.  Join in top of FPhtr from beg of rnd. (81, 87, 93, 96, 99)

Note:  for toddler & child beanies, you can omit rounds 10, 11, 12 & 13 if you want a less slouchy hat.  The toddlers in the photos include these rows.

Round 10, 11, 12 & 13:  Repeat rounds 6, 7, 8 & 9 (81, 87, 93, 96, 99)

Round 14:  repeat round 6.

Round 15:  ch 1, hdc2tog (see photos below).  *ch 1, sk 1, hdc2tog* – repeat from * to * until you reach beg of rnd (depending on the size you are working, you may need to ch 1 after the last hdc2tog to maintain st count.  Count your stitches to see if you need to or not, especially if you are customizing).  Join in top of hdc2tog from beg of rnd. (54, 58, 62, 64, 66)

 

Round 16:  ch 1, sc 1 in each of next 2 sts,  *sc 1 in ch sp, sc 1 in top of hdc2tog from prev rnd* – repeat from * to * until you reach beg of rnd.  Join in top of sc from beg of rnd. (54, 58, 62, 64, 66)

Round 17:  ch 1, FPhtr around hdc2tog & ch 1 from 2 rnds down.  *FPhtr around each hdc2tog from 2 rnds down* – repeat from * to * until you reach beg of rnd.  Join in top of FPhtr from beg of rnd. (27, 29, 31, 32, 33)

Round 18:  ch 1, hdc in each st around and join in top of 1st hdc from beg of rnd. (27, 29, 31, 32, 33)

The following are decrease rounds that will close up the top of the beanie

 Note:  1st stitch of each round is made in same place as ch st, unless otherwise indicated.

Round 19:

[toddler]  ch 1, *hdc 1 in each of next 2 sts, hdc2tog*  repeat from * to * 6 times total.  hdc 1, hdc2tog.  Join in top of 1st hdc from beg of rnd. (20)

[child]  ch 1, *hdc 1 in each of next 2 sts, hdc2tog* – repeat from * to 7 times total.  hdc in last st.  Join in top of 1st hdc from beg of rnd.  (22)

[small]  ch 1, *hdc 1 in each of next 2 sts, hdc2tog*  repeat from * to * 7 times total.  hdc 1, hdc2tog over last 2 sts.  Join in top of 1st hdc from beg of rnd. (23)

 ch 1, *hdc 1 in each of next 2 sts, hdc2tog * – repeat from * to * until you reach beg of round.  Join in top of 1st hdc from beg of rnd. (24)

[large]  ch 1, *hdc 1 in each of next 2 sts, hdc2tog* – repeat from * to 8 times total.  hdc in last st.  Join in top of 1st hdc from beg of rnd. (25)

Round 20:

[toddler]  ch 1, *hdc 1 in each of next 2 sts, hdc2tog* – repeat from * to * 5 times total.  Join in top of 1st hdc from beg of rnd. (15)

[child]  ch 1, *hdc 1 in each of next 2 sts, hdc2tog* – repeat from * to * 5 times total (two sts left), hdc in last 2 sts.  Join in top of 1st hdc from beg of rnd. (17)

[small]  ch 1, *hdc 1 in each of next 2 sts, hdc2tog* – repeat from * to * 5 times total (3 sts left), hdc 1, hdc2tog over last two sts.  Join in top of 1st hdc from beg of rnd. (17)

  ch 1, *hdc 1 in each of next 2 sts, hdc2tog* – repeat from * to * 6 times total.  Join in top of 1st hdc from beg of rnd. (18)

[large]   ch 1, *hdc 1 in each of next 2 sts, hdc2tog* – repeat from * to * 6 times total, hdc in last st. Join in top of hdc from beg of rnd. (19)

Round 21:

[toddler]  ch 1, *hdc2tog, hdc 1* – repeat from * to * 5 times total.  Join in top of hdc2tog from beg of rnd. (10)

[child]  ch 1, *hdc2tog, hdc 1* – repeat from * to * 5 times total.  hdc2tog over last 2 sts.  Join in top of hdc2tog from beg of rnd. (11)

[small]  ch 1, *hdc2tog, hdc 1* – repeat from * to * 4 times total (4 sts left) hdc2tog two times over next 4sts.  Join in top of hdc2tog from beg of rnd. (10)

  ch 1, *hdc2tog, hdc 1* – repeat from * to * 6 times total.  Join in top of hdc2tog from beg of rnd. (12)

[large]  ch 1, *hdc2tog, hdc 1* – repeat from * to * 5 times total.  hdc2tog 2 times.  Join in top of hdc2tog from beg of rnd. (12)

Round 22:

[toddler]  ch 1, *sc2tog* – repeat from * to * 5 times.  Join in top of sc2tog from beg of rnd.  (5)

[child]  ch1, sc2tog 4 times, hdc3tog.  Join in top of sc2tog from beg of rnd. (5)

[small]  ch 1, *sc2tog* – repeat from * to * 5 times.  Join in top of sc2tog from beg of rnd. (5)

  ch 1, *sc2 tog* – repeat from * to * 6 times.  Join in top of sc2tog from beg of rnd. (6)

 [Large]  ch 1, *sc2tog* – repeat from * to * 6 times.  Join in top of sc2tog from beg of rnd. (6)

cut a long tail and weave in, closing the tiny hole at the top together.

Congratulations!  You’re Finished!

Happy Crocheting,

 

 

Video Tutorials

How to Crochet: Half Treble Crochet Stitch (htr) | Easy Beginner Crochet Tutorial

Hi everyone! Thanks for stopping by!

This is an easy How To video on how create a Half Treble Crochet (htr). Half treble crochet is a stitch that combines a double crochet and a half double crochet into one stitch. It’s a great stitch to use working in the round, if you want to get the height, and also the knit effect a half double crochet creates when you work in the back loop only.

I recently used this stitch in a free pattern on my blog called the Winter Blush Beanie & Scarf set, you can find that here: http://www.stardustgoldcrochet.com

I used Lion Brand’s Heartland yarn for this tutorial.

I am in an affiliate program with Lion Brand, so if you happen to make a purchase, I will earn a small commission (win, win!). These commission helps me keep providing free video tutorials and free patterns on my blog (links below).

Do you have a stitch you’d like a video created? Leave a comment! I’d love to create a video tutorial for you.

Happy Crocheting!

 

Video Tutorials

How to Crochet: Dc2Tog – Double Crochet Decrease

HI everyone! Thanks for stopping by!

This is an easy How To video on how create a double crochet decrease, also known as dc2tog.

The double crochet decrease is abbreviated as dc2tog in most patterns. However, some designers will simply say “dec” or “dc dec” – these are all the same stitch! It can be confusing for sure, but as long as you learn it, you’ll remember for the next time you pick up a pattern.

Knit Picks Yarn in tutorial can be found here.

Would you like the latest stitch and free pattern videos?  Please subscribe to my YouTube Channel by clicking this link:

Subscribe to Stardust Gold Crochet Channel

Happy Crocheting!

Announcements

Do you love cotton? Me too! Get ready for the Blushing Winter Beanie & Scarf release and grab some on-sale yarn!

I can’t say enough about I Love This Cotton.  Even Prior to becoming an affiliate with Hobby Lobby, I sang the praises of this yarn left and right.  It’s so soft, and easy to work with.  The colors are lovely, and it’s the perfect yarn for everything from C2C baby blankets to scarfs, sweaters, hats, and ponchos.  It’s also reasonably priced for being 100% cotton, which is a plus!  So when it goes on sale I do a little happy dance!

It’s on sale for $2.65 a skein 😍.

I wanted to share this awesome sale with my fellow crafters because it doesn’t happen too often.

So prior to the release of the Blushing Winter Beanie & Scarf this Sunday, order up some I Love This Cotton, or head on over to Hobby Lobby and grab some skeins to make this beautiful set.

You will need about 5-6 skeins for this project and I used the colorway Warm Blush (hence the name Blushing Winter) 😉, but you can create this set in any color you’d like of course.

If you do decide to order from my link, I will receive a small commission which helps me keep this blog alive and provide free patterns for you lovely crocheters.

Happy Crocheting, and can’t wait until Friday!

 

Video Tutorials

How to Crochet: Honeycomb Stitch – Easy Crochet Tutorial

The Honeycomb stitch is a great stitch to create market bags, tops, skirts, and so much more.  It is an easy stitch for beginners to learn, and easily modified to create a smaller hole.

This is a modified version of the original Honeycomb stitch, I created this smaller version for the Honeycomb Mesh T – a free crochet pattern you can find here.

Would you like the latest stitch and free pattern videos?  Please subscribe to my YouTube Channel by clicking this link:

Subscribe to Stardust Gold Crochet Channel

 

Printable pattern PDF is available in my Ravelry & Etsy stores

Free Crochet Patterns Spring summer Wearables

Honeycomb Mesh Cropped T – Easy FREE Crochet Pattern

It’s still a little hot in Memphis, but this mesh T is perfect for any weather!  I used Lion Brands 24/7 cotton for this pattern because of it’s lovely colors and durability.  It’s cool and breathable, and has a great stretch to it.  Another positive is it is completely machine washable!

For this pattern, I set out to create a simple mesh cropped tank that provides coverage, but is also cool, airy, and withstands all the summer elements.  I took this top canoeing and it was perfect!

Printable pattern PDF is available in my Ravelry & Etsy stores

If you have any questions about this pattern, please leave a comment below, I am happy to answer any questions. Let’s get started!    I would love to see your finished patterns, if you have Instagram, Facebook, or a blog, please use hashtags

#stardustgoldcrochet #HoneycombMeshT

+Skill Level

Easy

+Reading the Pattern

~ Because we are working with a mesh, we will count the squares, not the stitches .

~ Pattern is made by completing two panels and sewing them together working from top down.

+ Materials

Suggested YarnLion Brand 24/7 Cotton in colorway Denim.

Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton

Hook:  4.5 mm

Scissors, Darning Needle

+ Yarn Details

100% Mercerized Cotton, 186 yds per skein (3.5 oz/100g)  – care:  Machine wash and dry.

+ Available Sizes

Pattern works in multiples of 4 + 2 (add 3 for foundation chain).  If you use recommended yarn, this will stretch, so if it seems small at first, trust me, when you wear it stretches a bit.

Child: (4-6), (6-8), (8-10)

Youth/Adult:  XS, S, M, L, XL, XXL, 1X, 2X, 3X

Yardage Needed   Skeins Yards
Child 4-6 1.5 279
6-8 1.75 325.5
8-10/XS 2.0 372
Adult S/M 2.5 465
  L 2.75 511.5
  XL 3 558
  XXL 3.5 651
  1X 3.75 697.5
  2X 4 744
  3X 4.5 837

+Abbreviations:

dc double crochet beg beginning
st(s) stitches ch chain
sp space ch sp chain space
sk st skip stitch *…* *repeat* instructions between *…*

+Stitch guide:

dc – double crochet

yo, insert hook in next st, yo, draw up a loop, (yo, draw through 2 loops) twice.

+Instructions:

Body Panels (make 2):

Using a 4.5 mm hook, chain the number of chains according to the table below:

Sizes   Chains
Child 4-6 125
6-8 129
8-10 133
Youth/Adult XS 137
Adult S 145
  M 149
  L 153
  XL 161
  XXL 165
  1X 173
  2X 181
  3X 193

Tip:  Counting for sizing – count each square, because of the mesh pattern, we work into the ch spaces of each square.

Honeycomb Mesh Stitch Video Tutorial Here

For all sizes:

Row 1:  dc in 6th ch from hook, *ch 2, sk 2, dc in next chain* – repeat from * to * to end of row.

Row 2:  ch 4, turn.  *dc in next ch sp, ch 2* – repeat from * to * until you reach end of row.

Row 3 – X:  Repeat Row 2 – until you reach the desired number of rows or height in the table below.

 note: The height of the rows listed in the table below is your armhole depth.  If you’d like, you customize this armhole depth by adjusting the number of rows, or you can use the following table, which is  a general guide for armhole depth taken from the yarn council guidelines.

Remember:  this yarn and stitch will stretch about 2”- 3″ when worn, and I’ve accounted for the stretch in the tables, if it seems small when you put it on, just give it a day – it will stretch to perfect fit.

Sizes   Rows Armhole Depth
Child 4-6 8 4.5”
6-8 9 5”
8-10 10 5”
Youth/Adult XS 11 6”
Adult S 12 6”
M 13 6.5”
L 16 7”
XL 17 7.5”
XXL 18 8”
1X 20-21 8.5-9”
2X 22-23 9-9.5”
3X 23-24 9.5-10.5

Once you reach the number of rows or measurement you wish, tie off, and weave in tails.

Next, we are going to mark the neck hole opening and sleeves, this is where we will create the remainder of the body. You can use different colored stitch markers, one color for the neck, and another color for the body.

Creating the Neck opening:

Using the table below.  Starting with the 1st square at each edge, counting inward.  Mark the final square (in the chain space) with a stitch marker.

Use the neck hole width guide to get an idea of how wide your neck hole should be (these averages are taken from the yarn council guides).  This will stretch, if it seems too tight, don’t worry ;).

Sizes   Sqs Neck hole width guide
Child 4-6 10 7”
6-8 12 8”
8-10 12 9”
Youth/Adult XS 14 11”
Adult S 15 12”
M 15 13”
L 16 14”
XL 16 15”
XXL 16 15”
1X 16 16”
2X 17 16”
3X 18 17”

Creating the body boundaries:

Place the garment with neck opening side closest to you.  Use the table below to find the number of squares you will need for your size – start with the 1st square on your right and count inward to the left.  Mark that final counted square with a stitch marker.  Repeat this working from the right side counting in to the left.

Sizes Sqs Sleeve depth from edge
Child 4-6 6 3”
6-8 6 3.5”
8-10 7 4”
Youth/Adult XS 7 4”
Adult S 8 4.5”
M 8 4.5”
L 9 5”
XL 9 5.5”
  XXL 10 6”
  1X 11 6.5”
  2X 12 7”
  3X 13 7.5”

Creating the rest of the body:

Attach yarn in the chain space with the 1st stitch marker (like photo below).  Then work the following rows:

Row 1:  ch 4.  *dc in next ch sp, ch 2* – repeat from * to * until you reach next st marker (the last dc of the row should be in the square with the stitch marker).

Row 2 – X (see table below):  ch 4, turn.  *dc in ch sp, ch 2* – repeat from * to * until you reach the number of rows in the table below.

Of course, the length of the top length is completely up to you!  You can create more rows if you’d like, just remember to switch to a larger hook before your reach the top of the hips to give you a little more stretch on the hips.

The table below is how many body rows you’ll need to create a crop top.

Sizes Rows
Child 4-6 9
6-8 9
8-10 9
Youth/Adult XS 10
Adult S 10
M 11
L 12
XL 12
  XXL 13
  1X 15
  2X 16
  3X 17

+Assembly

You will have two panels.  Lay on top of each other and sew along the dotted lines as pictured below.

Congratulations!  You’re finished!

All photos and pattern is property of Stardust Gold Crochet. *** Feel free to sell items created from this pattern, but please do not copy, distribute, or sell this pattern as your own.

+  If you love it so much you want to share a link to my Etsy, Ravelry, or my website, please do! +

+ Please create a project page on Ravelry, I’d love to see your work! +

#stardustgoldcrochet  #honeycombmeshT

Happy Crocheting 😊

Would you like the latest stitch and free pattern videos?  Please subscribe to my YouTube Channel by clicking this link:

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Crochet Design Tools Crochet Tips & Tricks Video Tutorials

How to Crochet: Chainless Foundation Stitches – 4 video tutorials include single, double, half double, & linked double crochet stitches

Hi everyone!

Have you ever wanted to learn how to create a chainless foundation chain?  I know you’ve looked at a pattern and the first row or starting point said “foundation single crochet,” then you think to yourself “what the heck is that???”   Oh noes!  😟 Don’t be afraid.  They are really easy to learn and once you learn them, I guarantee you’ll fall in love with it.

I didn’t understand the hype over this crochet technique until I started designing garments.  Chainless foundation chains help the garment stretch and prevent curling, which is so valuable for creating a garment that doesn’t bunch, or is too tight on your head, etc.

I have a feeling once you learn how to create these, you won’t ever create a normal chain again!

Want more free tutorials?  You can subscribe to my channel by clicking the link below

👇🏼👇🏼👇🏼

Subscribe to Stardust Gold Crochet Channel

They are also great because you create the chain and 1st row at the same time.  I use this technique in many of my patterns and hope these videos will help you create some of my lovely free patterns 😘, as well as conquer your fear of the dreaded chain-less foundation chains!

This video series covers the following:

Foundation (chainless) Single Crochet – abbreviated in patterns as fsc

Foundation (chainless) Double Crochet – abbreviated in patterns as fdc

Foundation (chainless) Linked Double Crochet – abbreviated in patterns as fldc

Foundation (chainless) Half Double Crochet – abbreviated in patterns as fhdc

So here are the videos!  I hope you enjoy them, and please leave any questions or comments in the comments section at the bottom of the page.  I am always happy to answer any questions you have!
(if you have trouble with these loading on IOS, or a slow browser – click the title links to open it up in YouTube)

Chainless Foundation Single Crochet

Chainless Double Crochet

Chainless Linked Double Crochet


Chainless Half Double Crochet

Happy Crocheting!,

Check out some of my affiliate link choices – when you click and browse or decide to buy something from my links, I receive a small commission, which helps me run this fabulous blog 🕺😊🙌

Crochet Calculators Crochet Design Tools

Crochet Stitch Calculator – calculate your stitch multiples to fit your desired project size

Are you a crochet designer? | Are you a beginner who wants to learn to create your own designs? | Do you love crochet, but not good at reading patterns? | Do you want to create a design without worrying about a pattern and just wing it!

This is the calculator for you.

As a designer, I love to create patterns from scratch.  This takes a lot of trial and error for sure, but a few years ago I purchased the Crochet Stitch Bible for stitch inspiration and learn new, fun stitches. Continue Reading

Crochet Calculators Crochet Design Tools

C2C Blanket Size Calculator will make you a C2C pro!

Ever wonder how big your C2C blanket will be? Me too!  So I came up with a calculation for that… 😉

We’ve all been there… the graph is 80 x 90 ~ 200 x 300 ~ 25 x 25 – but how BIG will that be?

The best way to figure it out is make a swatch, then do some math (ugggg).

With this calculator, you’ll still be making a swatch (but only a small one!) and I did the math for you (thank you Algebra 1B).

Continue Reading

Bags & Purses Crochet Free Crochet Patterns

More than a Market Bag ~ FREE crochet pattern and video tutorial

I love all crochet bags, well…most of them!  Some can be too bulky or too loose.  I wanted to design a functional market bag – but more than market bag – with beautiful color changes and most importantly, durable.  A bag that you can take to the beach, the market, or on a long walk at the park.  A bag that will hold *all* the stuff and not let it fall out!

Continue Reading

Crochet Graphs

Rosie the Riveter Graph, C2C written, row by row written graph, “We Can Do It” blanket pattern crochet blanket ~ crochet pattern

Rosie the Riveter is a symbol of strength and unity for women everywhere.  According to History.com

“Rosie the Riveter was the star of a campaign aimed at recruiting female workers for defense industries during World War II, and she became perhaps the most iconic image of working women. American women entered the workforce in unprecedented numbers during the war, as widespread male enlistment left gaping holes in the industrial labor force. Between 1940 and 1945, the female percentage of the U.S. workforce increased from 27 percent to nearly 37 percent, and by 1945 nearly one out of every four married women worked outside the home.”

Rosie The Riveter

I’ve always loved this image and wanted to create a graph I can make into an awesome throw.  This will be my next long term project after I finish the mini-spiderman throw for my grand baby 🙂 !  I spent a lot of care to make it as easy as possible (with only 10 colors) and also decided to create a written pattern for both C2C and row by row if you want to work the pattern in single, double, or half-double crochet.

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Also included is a full grid graph, and close-ups of the graph, as well as 4 pages of a close-up the graph sectioned off for easier viewing.  The file is 14 pages.

You can find the full PDF version on Etsy by clicking the photo below.

Rosie The Riveter Thumbs

The graph is 85 x 109 stitches (color blocks).

I’ve made some yarn suggestions in the pattern, but you’re welcome to use whatever worsted weight yarn you’d like.

The pattern also includes detailed instructions on how to create a C2C blanket and links on how to make decreases.

Rosie Overlay.jpg

I would love to see your finished projects, links to my social media is located at the bottom of the last page :).

I’m always happy to help with patterns, so please don’t hesitate to contact me with any questions!

Happy crocheting

Tasha Signature

Write Your Own Blog - Tips & Tricks

{BLOGGING 101} 10 Fastest Loading WordPress Themes – choosing a repsonsive theme for your blog

I’ve been in web design madness…

Create a website they said….it would be easy they said… lol. 🤣
, for the most part it is, but some template designs can completely throw off your entire site!  That’s what happened to me yesterday – so I apologize if you visited my site and it looked like someone threw-up in code and called it a day.

Continue Reading

Crochet Free Crochet Patterns summer Video Tutorials Wearables

Neptune Beach Dress ~ FREE crochet pattern

The inspiration for this beach dress came from a stitch I came up with using Tunisian crochet.  It was an accident actually, but I ended up falling in love with the stitch, and I’m calling it Tasha’s Tunisian Ribbing 😀 I wanted to create a tube top, but no other stitches out there gave me what I needed, so I made one up!  It creates a two-color vertical ribbing that is stretchy and easy to create.  Win!  I hope you enjoy this pattern and learn something new!

If you have any questions about this pattern, please leave a comment below – I’m happy to answer any questions!

An AD-free printable PDF is available on Etsy too!

Full Video Tutorial is at Bottom of Post <3

I would love to see your creations from this pattern, if you have Instagram, Facebook, or a blog, please use hashtag @stardustgoldcrochet #stardustgoldcrochet.  Thank you!  Let’s get started!  😉  Please read all notes!

How to Read This Pattern

I write my patterns for readability and make them beginner friendly.  The words in bold are stitches and actions.  Stitch counts are noted in the *notes* sections within the pattern and/or in parentheses at the end of each row. Remember to count your stitches 😉.

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Materials:

Suggested Yarn:

Lion Brand Heartland in Denali, Pink, Green & Purple Print I Love This Cotton! Yarn.

Sub for Heartland – Lion Brand 24/7 Cotton in Pink

Sub For I love This Cotton – Any ombre yarn colorway of your choice preferably cotton.

Yarn Details:

Lion Brand Heartland Denali – 251yds (230m)

I Love This Cotton – 180 yds (164 m)

Yardage Needed:

Lion Brand Denali – 2-3 skeins (500-600 yds (457 – 548 m)). I love This Cotton – 1 skein (180 yds (164 m)).

Hook Size:

5.5 mm (I-9) – double ended Tunisian crochet hook, regular 5.5 mm (I-9)

 

Size(s):

S/M/L/XL/XXL – Customization – Size adjustments are within the pattern.

Finished Measurements for Large:

If you follow the pattern exactly – you will get a size large – you can adjust the tube top to fit your perfect size, instructions are within the pattern.  Adjusting the circumference will automatically adjust the size of the mesh portion of the dress, the length of the dress is completely up to you :). Tube Top – Height 7.5-8” (19-22 cm)  Width Around 22” (55.8 cm)  without the lace. (the tube top stretches, fyi) Lace Area on Top – 5” (15.2 cm) Length from Top to Bottom – adjustable

Abbreviations:

 

TRS – Tunisian Rib Stitch / TLS – Tunisian Long Stitch / MC – main color / CC – contrasting color / ch – chain / ch sp – chain space / st(s) – stitches / yo – yarn over / sc – single crochet / beg – beginning / fwd pass – forward pass / rvs pass – reverse pass / lp(s) – loop(s) / sk st – skip stitch / *…* *repeat* instructions between *…*

 

Stitch guide:

sc – single crochet insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw through both lps on hook dc – double crochet yo, insert hook in indicated st, *yo, draw through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * until you have one loop left on hook.

Special Stitches

TLS – Tunisian Long Stitch – see video if this sounds confusing. fwd pass:  pull up a long loop with current loop on hook (3/4 – 1” tall), *insert hook in next st, yo and pull up a long loop* – *repeat* to end. rvs pass:  *yo, draw through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * back to beg of row. TRS – Tunisian Rib Stitch chain desired amount for foundation chain (in multiples of 2 for this pattern) Foundation Forward Pass (MC):  *insert hook in top of next chain and pull up a loop* – repeat from * to * to end of chain.  Below is an example of what your first foundation forward pass will look like. Foundation Reverse Pass (CC):  you will add your CC when working this reverse pass for the foundation row.  Turn hook then add CC over hook and pull through one loop (below). Ch 1. *yo, draw CC through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * until you reach the end and have only 1 loop left on the hook.  Don’t turn hook. Fwd Pass (MC):  let CC drop behind, pick up MC with your finger, *insert hook in next front bar, yo with MC and draw up a loop* – repeat from * to * to end.  Turn hook (remember to work into the last edge stitch by inserting through the 2 loops at the end – photo below)  Count your loops too to make sure you are on the right track. Rvs Pass (CC):  Drop MC, pick up CC and ch 1, *yo, draw through 2 loops*  – repeat from * to * back to beg.

You can slide it down and wear it as a skirt too 😍

 

 

Pattern:

To start…

We will use a Tunisian technique to create ribbing for the tube top.  Don’t be afraid of Tunisian crochet – it is almost easier than some regular crochet stitches believe it or not.  Please refer to the tutorial video for help with this ribbing stitch.  I will do my best to write it out in a way you can create without watching the video too, along with photos below.  So let’s get started!

NoteChaining 28 to begin will make a tube top that is around 8” tall (20 cm).  If you want to make this shorter, chain an even number, that when you subtract 1, will create multiples of 3.  (use 22, or 16 chains to start to make it smaller or 33 to make it taller).

Row 1 Foundation fwd pass (C1):  Chain 28 compete the foundation row for the TRS located in the stitch guide under special stitches. Row 1 Foundation rvs pass (C1):  complete the reverse pass of the foundation row for the TRS located in the stitch guide under special stitches. Row 2:  complete fwd pass according to special stitch guide under TRS. Row 2:  complete rvs pass according to TRS in stitch guide. Row 3 – to desired width:  Repeat Row 2.

NoteThe lace portion of the pattern will increase the circumference by around 5”. Below, I’ve recommended widths for the ribbing stitches to get the size you need – once you add the lace pattern to the end of the ribbing pattern, the total circumference of the tube top will be the number below + 5″ (12 cm) The ribbing stretches, so keep that in mind when deciding how wide to make your tube top piece.

 

S – 18” (45 cm) – M – 20” (50 cm) –

 

L – 22” (55 cm)  XL –  24”  (60 cm) – XXL – 26” (66 cm)

 

 

 

Lace and Joining:

 

NoteMake sure when working the lace, you have multiples of 3 to work into or the pattern will not work out properly, I explained this earlier in the pattern for casting on your foundation chain.

Row 1:  Cut CC, tie off.  Pick up MC, and ch1sc in each gap between vertical bars of each stitch – mine totaled 27 sc’s. Row 2:  ch 3, turn.  sk 2, sc in next st, *ch 2, sk 2, sc in next st* – repeat from * to * to end of row. Row 3:  ch 1, sc in 1st st, *sc 2 in ch sp, sc in next sc* – repeat from * to * to end of row (should end with sc in last stitch) (27) Row 4 fwd pass:   (TLS) ch 2, turnpull up a long loop, insert hook in 1st sc and pull up a long loop in each st across (make loops an even height and about .75 – 1” (1.9 cm) tall). Row 4 rvs pass:  (TLS) yo, draw through one loop, *yo, draw through 2 loops* – repeat from * to * until you have only one loop left on hook. Row 5:  ch 1, sc between each pair of front and back vertical bars to end of row. (27) Row 8:  Repeat rows 2 through 5 – 3 more times times, on the 3rd repeat – end after you complete row 2.

 

Joining:

ch 1, bring sides together and slip stitch into the the two loops of each stitch.

Body of Dress:

Note:  Don’t cut your yarn.    

Rnd 1:  ch 3, sc in 1st  CC row, *ch 2, sc in next CC row* – repeat from * to * to end.  When you reach the lace portion of the dress, continue the repeat pattern from * to * in the top of each of those rows.  Join with sl st.

Rnd 2:  Ch 3sl st into 1st ch sp *ch 2, sc in next ch sp* – repeat from * to * to end of round

Join with sl st in 1st ch 2 from beg of rnd.  Mark beg st with st marker.

Rnd 3:  *ch 2, sc in next ch sp* – repeat from * to * to end of rnd.  Join with sl st at tbase of 1st ch 2 from beg of rnd.

Rnd 4:  ch 3, sc in 1st ch sp *ch 2, sc in next ch sp* – repeat from * to * to end of rnd.  Join with sl st in base of ch3 from beg of rnd.

Rnd 5:  ch 1, sl st in 1st ch sp.  ch 2, [*yo, insert hook in same ch sp, yo and pull up a loop* – repeat from * to * two more times, then yo pull through all loops on hook, ch 1]  – repeat from [ to ] to end of rnd.  Join with sl st in top of ch 2.

Rnd 6:  ch 3, *dc in ch sp, ch 1, sk 1* – repeat from * to * to end of rnd.    Join in ch sp from beg of rnd.

Rnd 7:  ch 3, *dc in top of dc from R6.  ch 1, sk 1* – repeat from * to * to end of rnd.  Join with sl st in ch 3 sp from beg of rnd.    

Rnd 8 – desired length:  Repeat round 7.

Congratulations!  You’re finished!

I hope you enjoyed this pattern!  If you love it, please share ;).  Any questions?  Please leave me a comment below, or just say hi!  Thanks so much for visiting my blog!

Happy Hooking,

 

Crochet Free Crochet Patterns summer Video Tutorials Wearables

Beach Inspired Friendship Bracelets ~ FREE crochet pattern and video tutorial

Well, we just got back from Neptune beach, and it was awesome!  If you haven’t been to Hanna Park – definitely check it out, it’s worth your time.

While we were there, I didn’t crochet much because we were playing in the water or skating most of the time, but I did come up with a little cute pattern for beach friendship bracelets – because it was so hard to not crochet at all for a week! 😊


pattern is so simple and fun, you can make a bunch in just a few a minutes!

I wanted to create something simple, easy, and fun to make.  These cute bracelets are the perfect summer project.  Probably great to teach a beginner too or a perfect project for a child crocheter 😉

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I added some beads on the ends of the ties, and if you’re feeling ambitious, you can add more beads, or even a clasp and jump rings.

There is a full video tutorial at the end of the post – scroll down.

You can find the Ad-Free PDF Version Available HERE

WHAT YOU NEED:

Suggested Yarn:

Cashmere De Contone or any cotton DK weight (3)

colors:  0010, 0002, 0004, 0005, 0006, 0007

 

Yarn Details:

(10% Cashmere, 90% Cotton)

Hook Size:

4 mm (G) – or recommended hook for the yarn you are using Scissors Beads (optional) – I purchased the stars from Michael’s.

Sizing:

Pattern works in multiples of 4 + 3.  Using DK weight yarn with a 4 mm hook will result in a bracelet approximately 7″ long (excluding the ties and depending on your crochet tension).  Increase or reduce starting chain in multiples of 4 to increase or decrease size.

Abbreviations:

ch – chain / dc – double crochet / lsc – long single crochet / st – stitch / *repeat* – from * to *

Stitch guide:

lsc – long single crochet insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up loop to level of other stitches, yo, draw through both loops on hook. dc – double crochet yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw through 2 loops, yo, draw through 2 loops.

PATTERN:

The pattern below shows a double crochet crossing the other double crochets – ignore that!  Unless you *want* to work it like that, that is okay too.!  The long single crochet is what we work into the skipped stitch for this pattern (lsc).

**updated**

I realized yesterday that I completely left out the long single crochet stitch in the written pattern below – it’s fixed now!  Ooops!

To Start:

ch 34 + 3

Row 1:  dc in the 5th ch from hook.  dc in next 2 sts (total of 3 dc’s). go back to the 4th chain from beginning chain, and lsc in that st.  Then, *sk st, dc in next 3 sts, lsc in skipped st* – repeat from * to * to end of row. (You should have 2 ch’s left).  sk st, dc in last st of row.

Finishing:

Cut a long tail (about 5 inches) pull through and tie starting tail and ending tails together with a knot.

Embellishing:

You can add beads to the tail ends by first tying a small knot, add the bead, then tie another knot to secure the bead in place.

To add the star beads:  use some clear thread and sewing needle to attach them through the end where you tied the knots (kind of hiding the knots).

You’re finished!

See how easy that was???

For the full crochet tutorial, see video below.

Thanks for stopping by!

Crochet Fall Free Crochet Patterns Video Tutorials Wearables

Dusty Sprinkles Scarf ~ FREE crochet pattern and video tutorial

The inspiration for this scarf was to use up this these awesome sprinkle cakes yarn after I made my Kirra Cardigan (pattern here).  I wanted to create something easy to make.  A scarf with a twist!

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I would love to see your finished patterns, if you have Instagram, Facebook, or a blog, please use hashtags – I’ll be keeping an eye out for these tags!  I like to surprise people with random of acts kindness in the form of gifts (free stuff!).  So if you tag it, don’t be suprised if I send you a DM!

#stardustgoldcrochet #dustysprinklesscarf

Thank you!  Let’s get started!

Full Video Tutorial at bottom of post

Get your AD-free printable PDF on Etsy – clicking the photo will take you there :).

I’m super excited to finally have this finished!  This scarf is very simple and uses a heavy weight yarn, which is perfect for beginners.  The name Dusty Sprinkles came to me because the yarn I used is Sprinkle Cakes – by Caron Yarnspirations.  It has tiny sprinkles of rainbow colors and the base of the yarn reminded me of a dust storm with the varying earth tones.  I absolutely love it.   If you don’t have this yarn, that is OKAY!  I also worked it up using Lion Brand’s Wool-Ease yarn in charcoal and that looks fabulous too!

There is a complete video tutorial for this scarf  at the end of the post, and the written version is available in my Etsy store and on Ravelry.  I hope you enjoy this easy pattern and tutorial.  If you have any questions – please comment below – I’m always happy to answer them if you get stuck!   Of course, if you notice a mistake, please let me know – because guess what?  We are all human and make mistakes – just keepin’ it real y’all!

Materials:

Suggested Yarn:

Scarf in photo is created using Caron Sprinkle Cakes in Mocha Rainbow

Yarn Details:

Caron Sprinkle Cakes – (77% acrylic / 20% Wool/ 3% other) (8.5oz / 240 g) (204 yds/186m).

Care:

Hand wash.  Lay flat to dry.

Yardage:

408 yd (372m) appx.

Hook Size:

8 mm (L-11)

Scissors

Darning Needle

Toggle Buttons (Optional) – 2″ (need 2)

Size(s):

Adjustable – Although I recommend following the pattern – you can adjust this to make it longer or shorter by adding or omitting rows – you can also adjust the width by reducing your foundation chain in multiples of 2.

Finished Measurements:

Using Caron Sprinkle Cakes (without tassels):

     Length –52” (177 cm)

     Width – 9” (22 cm)

Using Lion Brand Wool-Ease – in Charcoal

     Length –53” (177 cm)

     Width – 9” (22 cm)

Abbreviations

sc(s) – single crochet / st(s) – stitches / sl st – slip stitch / fsc – foundation single crochet /

ch – chain / ch sp – chain space / lp(s) – loops(s) / pinst – pineapple stitch / sk st – skip stitch   /  *…* – *repeat* instructions between *…*

Stitch guide

sc – single crochet

insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw through both lps on hook

special stitch

pinst – pineapple stitch

[*yo, insert hook in indicated stitch and pull up a loop*  – *repeat* 2 more times in indicated stich.  yo, pull through all loops on hook.  yo, pull through 1 loop, sk st.] – repeat between [ … ] for one complete pineapple stitch.

How to Read This Pattern

I write my patterns for readability and make them beginner friendly.  The words in bold are stitches and actions.  Stitch counts are in parentheses at the end of each row.

Remember to count your stitches 😉.

Instructions

To start…

We create a foundation row using the foundation single crochet stitch (fsc).  It is considered the first row because you are creating the chain and sc stitches at the same time.   The stitch guide has detailed instructions on how to work the fsc.

Row 1:  fsc 22.

Row 2:  ch2, turn.  *sk st, sc in next, ch 1* – *repeat* to end of row, ending with 1 sc in last st.  (22)

Row 3:  ch2, turnsk 1st st, *sc in chain space, ch 1, sk st* – *repeat* to end of row. ending with 1 sc in last ch sp of row.  (22)

Row 4:  ch2, turnsk 1st st, pinst the rest of the row – as follows = [*yo, insert hook in ch sp and pull up a loop*  – *repeat* 2 more times in same ch sp.  yo, pull through all loops on hook.  yo, pull through 1 loop, sk st.] [repeat] to end. (22)

Row 5:  ch1, turnsc in each st and top of each ch space across row.  (22)

Row 6 – Desired length:  repeat rows 2 – 5 until you reach desired length.  Don’t break yarn.  You will continue to use it in the braids.

Stop pattern at row 5 when you reach your desired length.  My scarf had 12 rows of the pineapples.

Braiding the Tails & Crocheting them together (Version 1):

How the braids are created in a nutshell:  The braid rows are worked by chaining 20, and working back through 19 stitches, joining to the main body, and working back up the stitches away from the body (hope that makes sense).

 Click here to view the tutorial video for this portion of the pattern. Remember:  do not break yarn.

Chain 20.

Row 1:  sc in second ch from hook and down toward the main body.  sk 1st st on main body, sl st in next st on main body. (19)

Row 2:  ch 1, turn.  fpsc around each of the 19 sc’s from R1. (19)

Row 3:  ch 1, turn.  fpsc around each of the fpsc’s from R1.  Don’t forget the last st 😊.

sk st on main body, sl st in next st on main body.  (19)

Row 4:  sl st in next st on main body, chain 20.

Row 5, 6, 7:  Repeat rows 1, 2, 3. (19)

Row 8:  sk st on main body, sl st in next st on main body.  chain 20.

Row 9, 10, 11:  Repeat rows 1, 2, 3. (19)

Row 12:  Repeat R8.

Row 13, 14, 15:  Repeat rows 1, 2, 3. (19)

For some reason – I seem to have an extra stitch at the end – If you end up with one – just sl st into it and tie off.

For other side of scarf.  Join yarn in right most side in first chain – not sc of the row, and ch 20.  Work row 1 as normal, but when you get to the main body, skip the first and second sc of the row and work the sl st into  3rd.  We worked into the chain on the side, because it leaves a better edge.

Repeat Rows 1 – 15 on the other end of the cowl.

Weave the 4 tails into the pattern shown below.  Then we will work the rows below to join the tails and attach the tassels:

The video tutorial also goes over how to work the tails into a braids and attach them.

Row 1:  Weave the tails like photo below:

With the right side facing you (right side is whichever side you like better).  We are going to label the braids 1, 2, 3, 4 counting from left to right.  Braid 4 should be on your right.  After you’ve weaved them together,  Place braid 3 on top of braid 2, and insert hook through right-most side, attach yarn, ch 1, work one sc into that space.  Work 3 more sc’s through both braids. (4 sc) total.  Place braid 4 on top of braid 3, and continue working 4 sc’s across the top through both braids.  Ch 3, turn (8 sc total).

Button Hole Row

Row 2:  sc 1 in 7th ch/st from hook (count down the chain and across the stitches).  sc in next st, ch 2, sk 2 sts, sc in last st of row.  Cut, and weave in tails.  You can customize the size of your button/tassel holes.  I used 2”

Repeat braiding and Rows 1 on other side of scarf:  except for the button hole Row 2 – just ch 1, turn, and sc across entire row.  Unless of course you’d like to add tassels to both ends of the scarf.  If you do, just create button hole rows on both sides.

Variation of tails & button holes

You can omit the tassels or create button holes on both sides and omit the buttons!  It’s up to you 😊.

Tassels and/or Toggles (optional):

I came up with a couple of variations for this scarf because I loved it!  Version 2 of the braided tails is as follows…

Braids (Version 2):

 

Note:  This version is worked in a similar fashion to version 1 by chaining up from the body except there are a few modifications.  Once you complete the body of the scarf –

Continue working with yarn, don’t cut it and…

Chain 20.

Row 1:  sc in 2nd chain from hook, and in ea st to end of row.  sk 1 st on main body, sl st in next st on main body.  ch 1, turn. (19)

Row 2:  sc in front horizontal bar of each sc in R1. ch 1, turn.

Row 3:  sc in each st of row. sk 1 st on main body, sl st in next st on main body.

Row 4:  Repeat R2.

Row 5:  Repeat R3.

Row 6:  Repeat R2.

Row 7:  Repeat R3, except at end of this row – sl st into first st on main body – do not skip a st.

Row 8sl st in next st on main body, Chain 20, Repeat R1.

Row 9:  Repeat R2.

Row 10:  Repeat R3.

Row 11:  Repeat R2

Row 12:  Repeat R3.

Row 13:  Repeat R2.

Row 14:  Repeat R3, except at end of this row – sl st into first st on main body – do not skip a st.

Row 15:  Chain 20Repeat R1.

Row 16:  Repeat R2.

Row 17:  Repeat R3.

Row 18:  Repeat R2.

Row 19:  Repeat R3, except at end of this row, sl    st into first st on main body – don’t skip a st.

Rows 20:  Repeat R2.

Row 21:  Repeat R3.

Repeat on other side of scarf:

Join yarn in right most side in beginning chain (not first sc) of the row, and chain 20 – you can leave out the button holes on one end where you will attach the buttons.

Braiding the Tails & Crocheting them together:

Insert hook in all three of the tails and attach yarn, working into the side at first, then crocheting them together (video tutorial is helpful for this).

Row 1:  sc 8 sts across the top of the tails – spaced as evenly as possible (it’s a little quirky, working into the ends, but it doesn’t have to be perfect!)

Row 2:  ch 1, turn.  sc in each st across row.

Row 3:  (button hole row – to omit the button hole, just sc across the entire row)  ch 1, turn, sc 1, ch 2, sk 2, sc 2, ch 2, sk 2, sc 1 in last st of row.

Congratulations!  You’re finished!

Check out the video tutorials below

Crochet DIY For the Home Free Crochet Patterns

Planned Pooling ~ Are you scared? Don’t be! ~ simple guide to crochet planned pooling


Let’s talk about what planned pooling is.  Planned pooling is a style of crochet or knitting that involves a bit of counting, and strategically placing stitches so they create a pattern that ends up being a mix of argyle and plaid.   These are a few examples of plaid.

I think the reason it seems so confusing is because guessing which yarns will work for planned pooling seems daunting. It doesn’t have to be though!


Do you like videos? Me too!  Sooooooo……

I made a 12 minutes video that covers the basics of planned pooling.  It is at the end of this post, go check it out and please subscribe!


Choosing a Yarn

A few companies have embarked on creating yarns that are made for planned pooling, which makes it easier for sure!

A few of these yarns are listed here – from the blog Interweave and I’ve added a few more that I know work.

Worsted-Weight Acrylic

I Love This Cotton:Peony

Caron Simply Soft Paints:  Sunset Variegated

Lion Brand Yarns Vanna’s Choice:  Autumn Print, Charcoal Print

Red Heart Soft Yarn:  Greyscale

RED HEART Super Saver Yarn, Bright Mix: Earth & Sky, Mistletoe, Pink Camo, Zebra

Red Heart Yarn With Love 1816 Waterlily:  Fruit Punch

Universal Yarn Uptown Worsted:  First Down, Full Speed

Yarn Bee – Soft Secret Ombre’:  Whisper, Blueberry Hill

Worsted-Weight Acrylic Blend

Berroco Comfort:  Color 9830

Worsted-Weight Cotton Blend

Deborah Norville Cotton Soft Silk Multi Yarn-Stained Glass:  Stained Glass
Bulky Acrylic Yarns

Bernat Blanket – most colorways

Bernat Softee Chunky Ombre Yarn – (5) Bulky Chunky Gauge 100% Acrylic – 2.8 oz – Shadow – Machine Wash & Dry:  Shadow, Summerset Ombre

I must say, I am normally not a huge fan of variegated yarns.  They seem to take away from the being able to see the beautiful stitches crochet creates, and it seems somewhat useless to use it in projects meant to show of stitches (in my humble opinion).

I’ve changed my mind!  I love when my mind gets changed about something, it opens up a whole new world.  Soooooooo, I’ve changed my mind a bit with these yarns now that I’ve finally conquered planned pooling!  Just to give you a little insight on the difference between variegated yarns and ombre’ yarns, here are examples of both.

These are examples of variegated yarn:

These are examples of Ombre’ yarn.  You can see the difference in transition of colors.  It’s quite different from variegated. 

Let’s Get Down to Business!

Planned Pooling

I’ve laid out the basic steps and below that, we break it down further with TIPS on how to make your planned pooling project perfect.

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Planned Pooling Step-by-Step – the Basics

1.  Find a yarn that works (we covered that a little above).

2.  Find the color sequence and write it down.

3.  Make a long chain that sequences through every color.

4.  Single crochet or Moss stitch back through the entire sequence (I’ll stress this throughout – tension is important – make sure both V’s of your stitches are the same color – more details below)

5.  Count the number of stitches in each color and write it down.

6.  Head over to this Planned Pooling Tool and enter your color sequence.  Then add or subtract stitches until you get a good argyle or plaid print.

7.  Print it out, and flip it upside down, because the top is actually the starting row.

8.  Begin crocheting.

Let’s break down the steps and start crocheting…

Step 1 – Find that yarn!

The first step is to find a variegated yarn that has 5-6 inches of each color change within the yarn – below is an example from the Vanna’s Choice – Charcoal.

Planned Pooling

You can use the yarns listed above to make it easier, or go in search of your own variegated yarns and maybe find a new one to add to the list!

Step 2 – Discover the sequence of the colors

This is somewhat easy to do, but can be a little confusing at first.  Normally variegated yarns are not dyed randomly, they have a sequence.  The yarn I used in the dishtowel is called Peony by I Love This Cotton.

I found an 8 color sequence consisting of 5 colors:

(1)  Dark green (2)  Light green (3)  Dark green (4)  Cream  (5)  Red  (6)  Turquoise  (7)  Red   (8)  Cream

Then the sequence repeats with dark green, light green, dark green, etc.

This is what my color pattern looked like for the Peony by I love This Cotton.  There is a little bit of purple at where the turquoise and reds meet, but I lumped that in with the stitch count for the red.

In another example, I used Vanna’s Choice, in Charcoal.  You can see below the sequence is pretty short.  With light grey, dark grey, black, then dark grey again.  So this sequence has 4 colors before it repeats.

(1)  Light grey  (2)  Dark Grey  (3)  Black  (4)  Dark Grey

Vanna's Choice Charcoal

Step 3 – Crochet a long chain

End the chain with the last color of the sequence, pull up a loop in the first color of the sequence (see arrow below).  For me, this was ending with dark green, and I pulled up one loop in the cream.  As you can see, there is some of tail left over because our sequence began with color 8 (cream) and ended with color 1 (dark green).


Step 4 – Single crochet or moss stitch back down the chain and count the number of stitches in each color.

Begin crocheting in single crochet or moss stitch, and count how many stitches each color will make.  For me, this was…

(4) Dark green, (4) Light green, (4) Dark green, (4) Cream, (4) Red, (3) Turquoise, (4) Red, (4) Cream

I used single crochet to learn this technique – but moss stitch looks great too.  If you decide to do a moss stitch – you need to make sure your stitches are an even count (2, 4, 6, etc.).

TIP:  Make sure the “V” of the last stitch of each color is the same – if you find that the right leg of the V is green and the left leg of the V is light green – rip it back and adjust your tension to get a complete stitch in the color you need, and the loop on the hook will be the next color.  Like this:

Write down your color sequence – the photo below is for Vanna’s Choice – Charcoal.

You can see above that the light grey has 8 stitches – each V of the stitch is grey.

When you finish crocheting back through your sequence, you’ll have a long tail.  Don’t worry about it for now, we will deal with that later!  It’s easy, just cut it and unravel it until you reach your first stitch of the row….then weave in the tail.

Planned Pooling

Step 5 – Use the Planned Pooling tool to find the number of stitches you will need to create the pattern.

In step 5, head on over to this Planned Pooling Tool and enter your color sequence.

Then add or subtract stitches (not the stitch count of your colors, but how long you need to make it in order to create the pattern) – It’s labeled “Stitches in Row.”

As you can see from the image above, the stitches in the row are 18.  If I began crocheting this pattern, it would end up looking like the photo above – so we need to add stitches by clicking the “1 stitch longer” or “5 stitch longer” button at the top of the page.  Do this until you get a good argyle or plaid print.

For me, the magic number was 46.

It’s a good idea to print this out.  When you do…flip it upside down.  The top part of this graphic is actually the the bottom row.


(If you’d like to use the pattern above, I used Peony by I Love This Cotton – this is what it looks like)

planned pooling


Here is an example of the pooling tool with the Vanna’s Choice in Charcoal.  The magic number for this one is 37.

TIP:  Whether you are making a scarf, a kitchen towel, pillow, or blanket – you can increase the stitch count to create the size you need for your project.  Of course, this will also take more yarn for larger projects, so make sure you use the same lots for this or your color stitch count or sequence may get messed up.

Here is a sample of what it would look like if I used 94 stitches!

Planned Pooling

Step 6 – Begin your project!

Now, continue crocheting down the chain until you reach the stitch count mapped out in the planned pooling tool.  You many need to rip it back and make a longer starting chain to depending how many stitches create your pattern.

My pattern called for 46 stitches in a row, so I crocheted 46 stitches.  I still had a bit of a tail left over. You can see below that I had to add a new skein mid-way.  If you end up needing to add a new skein, match up the color sequence then join, then continue with your pattern.

Planned Pooling

So, you may ask yourself….what do I do when I come to the end of a row and I’ve only crocheted 2 stitches of the color block?  Do not chain.  Just turn your work, then work the next st in the first stitch of the row.

For instance, if your color block is 5 stitches long, and you come to the end of the row and crocheted 3 of that color…you are short by 2, so just turn the work and finish the 2 stitches on the next row.  You are still completing 5 stitches in that color, but continuing it to the next row.  Tensionplays a role in this too.  See below for some tension tips.

TIP:  Do not chain 1 at the end of each row.  Just work back in the 1st st of the row.

MUST READ! – It’s all about the Tension

Tensionis perhaps the most important aspect of planned pooling, aside from basic counting! lol.  Tension, tension, tension.  You may need to loosen it or tighten it throughout the project to keep your color stitch count accurate and remember – you want to both V’s of the last stitch of the color block to be the same color and pull up a loop in the next color.

If you find that the last stitch of the V is in the next color, frog (frogging is ripping it back, aka ribbit ribbit – frog lol)  it back to the the last color and tighten your tension or loosen it to get all your V’s for that color to be consistent.

Baby Soft Pillow Free Pattern (Planned Pooling)

Baby Soft Planned Pooling Pillow

Okay!  So here is a fun project for you to get started.  If you’d like to make this pattern, I’ve already done the leg work for you.  Here is a link to the pattern from the planned pooling website:  Click Here, then print it out.

Front of Pillow – Planned Pooling Pattern:

Gauge:

Yarn:

Soft Secret by Yarn Bee – in colorway “Whisper” – Yardage= 1 skiein

Hook Size:

H hook (5.00 mm)

Pattern:

Follow this pattern (pictured below)

stitch counts are 49 stitches per row and 61 rows tall.

Back of Pillow Pattern: – Moss Stitch Variation

Gauge:

Yarn:

Soft Secret by Yarn Bee – in colorway “Ivory” – Yardage = 1 skein

Hook Size:

H hook (5.00 mm)

Pattern:

Chain 50.

Row 1:  sc in first st.  *ch 1, sc in next st* – repeat to end.

Row 2:  ch 1, turn.  sc in 1st ch sp.  *ch 1, sc in next ch sp* – repeat to end.

Rows 3 – end:  repeat Row 2 until you reach the same height as the front of pillow.

Depending on your gauge, it may be slightly small on the sides than the front of the pillow – I solved this by blocking them together so they match in size.

Block it – Let it sit over night to dry.

Remove the pins…

Place sides together…

Whip stitch or slip stitch sides together, leaving a hole big enough for stuffing.

Turn it inside out and add stuffing…

Sew it up…


You’re Finished!

I hope you enjoy this step-by-step guide to planned pooling today!  If I missed something, or you have a tip to add, please leave a comment – I will update it :).

I’m here to answer any questions too! If these videos don’t play on your browser – head over to my YouTube channel to view them. Stardust Gold Crochet Channel

Part 1 – Choosing the Right Yarns

 

Part 2 – Simple 12 Minute Tutorial on Planned Pooling


Happy Crocheting,

Crochet Crochet Tips & Tricks DIY Fall Wearables

Anatomy of a Sock ~ Learn to crochet socks complete tutorial ~ for beginners and designers

Recently, I endeavored to learn how to crochet a sock.  Through this endeavor I discovered just how difficult it was….there is nothing out there that told me how, and only patterns of finished socks.  That’s all fine and dandy, but I like to create my own designs! I love to dissect and break it down – most of all I want it simple and easy to follow.

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Here is what I learned.

Socks have an anatomy.  I noticed there were varying versions depending on if someone is knitting or crocheting, but here is the gist of it.

Have you heard the term “top down” or “toe up?” Those are the directions you normally work a sock.  Have you heard the term “heel flap” or “heel turn?”  Here we will explore the two styles of working crochet socks from Cuff (Top) down and Toe-Up.  There are several ways to shape heels and I’ve included the various ways throughout both versions of the socks below.  Several can be applied to both directions, so I hope it isn’t too confusing.

If you want a fun pattern to make after you’ve learned to create socks, here is one I created called the Rainbow Fish Socks/ Booties.   Clicking the photos will take you to the pattern.

Let’s break these socks down…

 

Top (Cuff)-Down Crochet Sock:

The top-down version starts with the cuff, and works toward the toe. The order of working a top-down sock goes like this:  cuff, leg, heel, gusset, foot, toe.  Digging deeper…

Creating the Cuff

The cuff is the top few inches of the sock. You can use a ribbed pattern, or add a fun picot border to the top after the first row is worked.  I wrote a blog post that covers 5 simple ribbing patterns – here.  Explore and be creative. You want to measure the circumference of your leg where you want the cuff to land. i.e., below the knee, middle of the calf, above the knee, or around the ankle. Depending on where you choose depends on how you will work the leg of the sock and how many stitches you will begin with.  Remember that the cuff is normally a ribbing so it has a little stretch to it., but you can work a fancier stitch or a picot border for the cuff too.  After you complete your cuff, you will move on to the leg.

Transitioning to the Leg

The leg is self-explanatory – it is the region worked between the cuff and the heel/gusset, although working the heel often comes before working the gusset.  Designing a pattern for the leg is completely up to you.  Some people design cable patterns, others choose more simple designs like using single crochet or double crochet.  Here are a couple examples from Annie’s Crochet by Rohn Strong.  The red is a cable pattern and the one below is a pineapple pattern.

If you’d like to create these socks, you can order this book on Amazon here:

You can make the leg as long or as short as you would like.  For my Rainbow Fish booties, I used two different sizes and worked most of the leg using the diagonal lattice stitch, then I attached the cuff after that, working up again.

Although, traditionally, you will work the cuff, then the leg, and onto the heel, then the gusset….so let’s talk about different ways to shape a heel working from the top down.

TIP:  The calf is larger than the ankle region, so if you want your sock to fit properly, be sure to add increases the higher you go.  You can also use a stitch that has a little give to it.  Another way to achieve that is to work a ribbing pattern vertically instead of working in the round.

Different ways to shape a Heel

There are so many ways to shape a heel.  The socks I created here were created using simple back and forth rows called a short row heel, decreasing using sc2tog at the end and beginning of each row, then increasing by single crocheting 2 stitches in the same stitch and then sewing the sides together.

TIP:  Work your increase into the second stitch – it leaves a cleaner edge.

Other methods include creating a heel flap, that leads into a heel turn.    The photo below is knitted, but the idea is the same.  You can see how the heel is worked in rows, then the heel turn is where you make a number of decrease rows, then merge the ends together to form the heel.

The version in the photo above I find a little too complicated and not sure how I feel about how it looks, but that is what is great about all the different ways you can create them.  It’s your preference and the stitches you choose will make a big difference in the look and feel of your sock.

While designing the Rainbow Fish socks, I searched everywhere to find how to work a heel ~ again ~ nothing really laid it out.  As a designer, I just want to know how to create it and leave the stitch count up to me ya know? So let’s break down that too.

Top-down heels:

Single Crochet Heel Flap

This heel flap is worked in all single crochet with a heel turn.  The rows are worked without decreasing or with decreasing – it’s preference.  It’s a little confusing because with crochet there are so many different terms people use for the same thing.  Although, similar to the photo above, and when you reach the point of the project you’d like to make the heel turn is when you begin shaping the turn of the heel by decreasing.

To work this heel:

Count the number of stitches you have around the base of your leg.  Divide it in half and that is the number of stitches you will use to create your heel.  Let’s say 20 stitches.  When you are ready to create your heel (around mid ankle or just below the ankle) – Begin by working in rows from around mid ankle to mid ankle.  So you will create 20 single crochets (or whatever stitch you are using).  Chain 1, turn your work and work several rows in the same number of stitches.  When you reach the point you would like the curve to begin, that’s where you will begin to shape the heel by decreasing every row or every other row (decrease on both sides) until it shapes the round of the heel.  You join the decreased rows to the flap by sewing them together now – or later.  Begin working the gusset by using your stitch and going around the entire circumference.

Double/Single Crochet Heel Flap

This heel flap is created the same method heel flap above, but has alternating rows of single and double crochet and this one uses a heel turn too.

After-thought heel

The after-thought heel is added after you have created the sock. You will add the heel by attaching the yarn in the far most corner of your opening (more details on how to create this below).

Heels for toe-up or cuff-down:

Afterthought Heel (how to create the heel)

The afterthought heel is added after the rest of the sock is worked up.  Below is a photo from crochet designer Pam Daley.  These are yoga socks, but a great example of what your sock will look like before adding the afterthought heel.

To create a sock that has a hole for an afterthought heel – work the cuff and leg of the sock.  Again, count the number of stitches you have at the bottom of the leg, then divide it by two.  Don’t break yarn, but make a chain of that number.  Let’s say our stitch count was 40 – so we will create a stopping point, and chain 20.  Then skip 20 stitches below, in the 21st stitch, work your first stitch and continue working in rounds.  This will create a hole for you to add a heel later.

The easiest way to create an an afterthought heel is using the short-row style.  Attach the yarn in the far-most corner to begin your row.  The description below is the same as for working toe-up pattern so I copied it here, except for the afterthought you will be attaching the yarn to the opening instead of working straight off the leg.

Short-Row Heel

The short row heel (like I created for the Rainbow Fish pattern is a short-row heel).  The short-row heel is composed of stitches worked over half of the stitches of the entire foot section.  So if you have 30 stitches around for your foot, work 15 single crochets to start the base of your heel.  Then create rows decreasing at the beginning and end of each row, or every other row until you have about 7-10 stitches left.  Then chain and turn, work one row of single crochet, chain and turn, then work increase rows until you reach your starting stitch count (for this sample that would be 15).  You can stitch up the ends later….then move on to the gusset and leg.

Heel shaping:

Following a general pattern for shaping a heel, this is what one style looks like:

This pattern (just pretend there is a leg attached to the bottom lol), works the number of stitches you need for your heel (remember the formula – take the number of stitches in the bottom of your leg, and divide it by 2), chain and turn, then work your stitch across the row leaving the last two stitches unworked (see the left side of row 2 above).  Chain and turn, and repeating that until you have around six stitches (see the top row in the photo).  Cut the yarn.  “Right side” facing you, attach new yarn in the first unworked stitch (the photo above shows the attached yarn, I chained 1, and made 1 sc in next stitch), make your next stitch in the next unworked stitch, and in each unworked stitch up the pyramid, and across the top six stitches, then down the other side.  I hope that makes sense.  It will draw it in and create the heel shape (see photo below).  You can use this method on both top-down and toe-up socks as well as with the afterthought heel style.  This is just one way to create a heel, you can work another pyramid like this and piece it together to create one large heel.

Moving on to the gusset….

The Gusset & Instep area:

In knitting, this area is a little more prominent than what I’ve seen in crochet, the gusset is the few rows that attach to the heel over the top of the foot, but not yet reaching the middle of the foot.  The picture at the beginning of the blog gives a good idea of locating it. Although, also, in knitting, some people work an area called the instep.  For the socks I created, I used a simple top-down method with a simple heel, no instep or gusset per say and they fit amazing.

Foot

The foot area is the region you create after the heel and gussets are finished and you begin to work in the round “connecting” the two.  You then work the rounds until you reach your desired length, generally, about until you reach the base of your toes.

Toe

When you complete the foot region, begin your rounds with making decreases until you have a small slit opening, which you will sew together.  When you sew it together, turn your sock inside out, so the seam is on the inside.

And of course, when working the Toe up version is worked opposite, like this…there are aspects that cross over from toe-up and cuff-down.

Toe – Up Crochet Sock:

Start with the Toe

When you begin a sock with the toe, I must admit it takes a little more thought and planning.  Toe-up socks start by making a foundation chain measuring about 2-3″ (5-8cm), then working in rounds.  Use a stitch marker to mark the beginning and end of each round, so you can keep track of your increases.  For instance, you create a foundation chain.  work a row of single crochet in each chain (mark the last stitch).  Single crochet around the bottom side until you reach the beginning (place a stitch marker in that stitch).  Continue working your stitches around until you reach the next stitch marker and make two stitches in that place.  Replace the stitch marker in the first of those two stitches.  Continue around until you reach the next stitch marker and make two stitches in that place.  You get the gist of it?

Continue making rounds where the increases are made at each end where you place your stitch marker, and when it fits nicely around your toes, you stop increasing and begin working the “foot” area in rounds until you reach the gusset, or where you’d like the heel to start.

You can also make a toe using a method that looks like this:

This pattern starts off with a row of single crochet.  Measure around the widest part of your foot about the ball.  Then reduce that measurement a little to account for stretching.  Then work another single crochet row.

Then with each new row, single crochet across each row, but leave the last single crochet unworked (as seen in the photo above).  Continue like that until you have 6-10 stitches (depending on your size).  *Make a single crochet in the unworked stitch below (see photo above, it may be a few rows below, but don’t worry), then work a slip stitch into the side of the row below that.  Turn, and single crochet across to the other side* and repeat from * to *.  Repeat this pattern until the toe closes and it will look like this:

To the Foot

Once you complete the toe, you’ll begin working rounds to complete the foot.  Make it as long or as short as you’d like, but make sure it fits around and the right length.  The standard for women size 7 (39 euro) shoe is about 5″ (12cm).

Toe-up Heels:

Short-Row Heel

The short row heel (like I created for the Rainbow Fish pattern is a short-row heel).  The short-row heel is composed of stitches worked over half of the stitches of the entire foot section.  So if you have 30 stitches around for your foot, work 15 single crochets to start the base of your heel.  Then create rows decreasing at the beginning and end of each row, or every other row until you have about 7-10 stitches left.  Then chain and turn, work one row of single crochet, chain and turn, then work increase rows until you reach your starting stitch count (for this sample that would be 15).  You can stitch up the ends later….then move on to the gusset and leg.  You can also use any of the other heel methods lists as toe-up and cuff-down.

Gusset

The gusset area is where you draw the heel to the foot and begin working up.  The gusset for a crochet sock is just a few rows, but some people like to shape or tighten this area to fit.  It may require an increase or two to fit as this is the widest part of the foot.

Leg

As you work up the leg, you can work in rows or create interesting patterns or use a special stitch.  Be creative!  Just remember to increase accordingly if you decide to make a very tall sock that will go over your calf.  You can also use the ribbing styles below to create a vertical ribbing pattern as your leg of the sock and use a picot as a cuff!

Cuff

When you reach the length you want (you can create extra tall socks or over the knee socks too!) then begin working a cuff.  Here are a few ways to create crochet ribbing – you can use these or use front and back post crochet to create ridges too.  Picot stitches make for a fun edge too.  Again, be creative!  Click photo below to see the blog post about ribbing.

I hope you’ve learned something new today!  Please leave any comments or questions – I’m happy to answer as best I can.

Please share if you love it!

<3 Tasha

~Inspire, Learn, Create

 

 

4th of July Crochet Free Crochet Patterns Seasonal Wearables

Abby’s American Dream 4th of July bikini ~ FREE crochet pattern with full photo tutorial

Abby's American Dream Bikini Pattern

It’s almost the 4th of July and you want a great bikini top to show your pride. :).  4th of July Bikini Crochet Tutorial.

Abby – I got you girl!  Tasha to the rescue!  p.s. – this is Abby and she’s pretty great.

I’ve created a few bikini patterns in the past and even had some inspiration photos laying around, so I set out to create a design for Abby that is:

1.  Supportive.  2.  Sturdy and durable   3. Colorful!

I hope you enjoy this pattern, it is definitely a beginner friendly pattern and easily adjustable.  I’ve written the pattern for a size DD top and size L bottom.  However, you can easily adjust the starting chain to modify to fit your body and I will walk you though how to do that.

Want a PDF ad-free version?  You can find that HERE. and on Etsy HERE

I’ve included stitch counts for medium and small in the pattern, for all but the border portion.  If you want to customize it further – follow these guidelines –  mind you – this is a general guide – and if you are like me and have a giant rear-end – well, I’d say increase the foundation row a bit to fit your coverage needs :).  For this pattern I used basically two triangles and a straight row in the center, which they don’t have pictured below, but it looks like this and these are the measurements for the Large/XL pattern.

Bikini Measurements
Materials:

Suggested Yarn:

Lily Sugar n’ Cream 100% Cotton (white, blue, red)

Here is a link to some good deals on Amazon for this yarn, or you can find them at your local Michael’s and Hobby Lobby too.

(click photo for link)

Details:

100% Cotton (2.5oz/70.9 g, 120yds/109m).

Care: Wash cold to maintain color.
Yardage Needed: 1 skein of Red & White 2 skeins of Blue. 200-300 yards total.
Hook Size: 5 mm (H)
Scissors
Darning Needle

size(s):  32A – 36DD, 38DD, 40DD, 42DD, 44DD

We focus on the cup size, the drawstring around the base of the breasts is flexible. Smaller cup sizes are within the pattern below, simply stop working the rows at a point you feel you want to stop to fit your size.

Abbreviations:

beg – beginning / fdc – foundation double crochet / hdc – foundation half double crochet hdc – half double crochet / st(s) – stitches(s) / ch(s) – chain / inc – increase / dec – decrease yo – yarn over / lp(s) – loop / R(s) – row(s) / sk st – skip stitch / sl st – slip stitch / *…*      *repeat* instructions between *…*

Stitch guide:

fdc – foundation double crochet

create a slip knot, ch 3, yo insert hook in first ch, *yo, pull up a loop, ch 1, yo, pull through 2 loops until one loop is left on hook* – repeat between*, except insert hook around both lps of ch 1.

hdc – half double crochet

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw through all three loops on hook.

dc dec – double crochet decrease

yo, insert hook in indicated st. yo, draw up a lp, yo, draw through 2 lps.  yo, insert hook in next st, yo, draw up a lp. yo draw through 2 lps, yo, draw through 3 lps on hook.

hdc dec – half double decrease

yo, insert hook in indicated st, yo, draw up a lp.  yo, insert hook in next st, draw up a lp.  yo, draw through 5 lps on hook.

fhdc – foundation half double crochet

create a slip knot, ch 3, *yo, insert hook in first ch and draw up a loop. ch 1, yo, draw through all loops on hook.  repeat from * by inserting hook in two loops of the ch1 you made.

Pattern

Instructions:

To start…

We will create a foundation row using the foundation double crochet (fdc).  Tutorial, click here.  It is considered the first row because you are creating the chain and dc stitches at the same time.   The stitch guide has detailed instructions on how to work the fdc.

note:  carry tails for white and red rows, no need to cut the yarn – you will work a hdc border and hide them.

Abby's American Dream Crochet Bikini

 

Bikini Cups (make 2)

Row 1:  White – fdc26 (24, 22) (chain doesn’t count as a stitch)

Row 2:  White – ch 1, turn. hdc26 (24, 22).

Row 3:  Red – ch 2, dc (blo) entire row make 1dec at beg and 1 dec at end. (24) (22, 20)

Row 4:  Red – ch 1, turn. hdc entire row, make 1dec at beg and 1 dec at end. (22) (20, 18).

Row 5:  White – ch 2, turndc (blo) entire row. (22) (18, 16)

Row 6:  White – ch 1, turn, hdc entire row make 1dec at beg and 1 dec at end. (20) (16, 14)

Row 7:  Red – ch 2, turndc (blo) entire row.  make 1dec at beg and 1 dec at end. (18) (14, 12)

Row 8:  Red, ch 1, turnhdc entire row, make 1dec at beg and 1 dec at end. (16) (12, 10)

Row 9:  White – Repeat7. (14) (10, 8)

Row 10:  White- Repeat 8. (12) (8, 6)

Row 11:  Red- Repeat 7. (10) (6, 4)

Row 12:  Red – Repeat 8. (8) (4) small: for small, don’t repeat 8, just skip to Row 15. (2).

Row 13:  White – Repeat 7. (6) medium:  for medium, don’t repeat 7, skip to Row 15, but complete it in white. (2).

Row 14:  White – Repeat8. (4)

Row 15:  Red – make 2 decreases (2).  leave long tails for weaving in and cut.

Blue Border:

note:  Stitch counts listed are for DD – if you are making the medium or small they will be different, but still follow the pattern as best you can.

for Row 1 of border, you’ll be making 4 hdc into edge each color, when you reach the 4th hdc of the series of 4, work into the carried yarn and not the actual hdc st, it creates less of a gap that way.  Stitch counts are in parentheses throughout R1 to keep you on track.

With RS facing you (RS has the ridges and the starting tail is on your bottom right-hand side)  Attach blue yarn in hole where beg tail is.

photo shows “Right Side”  – RS

Abby's American Dream Crochet Bikini

Abby's American Dream Crochet Bikini

Border Row 1ch 2, hdc1 in bottom of ch.  make 4 hdc spaced evenly across the end of each color row (28). see photo below

Abby's American Dream Crochet Bikini

hdc 2 in side of last